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Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control

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  • Authors: Liang Yang1, Michael Givskov3
  • Editors: Mahmoud Ghannoum5, Matthew Parsek6, Marvin Whiteley7, Pranab Mukherjee8
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Singapore Center on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2: School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798; 3: Singapore Center on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 4: Costerton Biofilm Center, Department of International Health, Immunology, and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, 2200 København N, Denmark; 5: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; 6: University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 7: University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; 8: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Source: microbiolspec August 2015 vol. 3 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015
  • Received 02 March 2015 Accepted 03 March 2015 Published 07 August 2015
  • Michael Givskov, mgivskov@sund.ku.dk
image of Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control
  • Abstract:

    Microbes live as densely populated multicellular surface-attached biofilm communities embedded in self-generated, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). EPSs serve as a scaffold for cross-linking biofilm cells and support development of biofilm architecture and functions. Biofilms can have a clear negative impact on humans, where biofilms are a common denominator in many chronic diseases in which they prime development of destructive inflammatory conditions and the failure of our immune system to efficiently cope with them. Our current assortment of antimicrobial agents cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms. For industrial applications, the removal of biofilms within production machinery in the paper and hygienic food packaging industry, cooling water circuits, and drinking water manufacturing systems can be critical for the safety and efficacy of those processes. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process that involves microbial cell migration, cell-to-cell signaling and interactions, EPS synthesis, and cell-EPS interactions. Recent progress of fundamental biofilm research has shed light on novel chemical biology strategies for biofilm control. In this article, chemical biology strategies targeting the bacterial intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways will be discussed.

  • Citation: Yang L, Givskov M. 2015. Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control. Microbiol Spectrum 3(4):MB-0019-2015. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015.

Key Concept Ranking

Signal Transduction
0.64443296
Signalling Pathway
0.6361311
Signal Molecules
0.635539
Chemicals
0.620791
Quorum Sensing
0.6013027
0.64443296
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/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015
2015-08-07
2018-07-16

Abstract:

Microbes live as densely populated multicellular surface-attached biofilm communities embedded in self-generated, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). EPSs serve as a scaffold for cross-linking biofilm cells and support development of biofilm architecture and functions. Biofilms can have a clear negative impact on humans, where biofilms are a common denominator in many chronic diseases in which they prime development of destructive inflammatory conditions and the failure of our immune system to efficiently cope with them. Our current assortment of antimicrobial agents cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms. For industrial applications, the removal of biofilms within production machinery in the paper and hygienic food packaging industry, cooling water circuits, and drinking water manufacturing systems can be critical for the safety and efficacy of those processes. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process that involves microbial cell migration, cell-to-cell signaling and interactions, EPS synthesis, and cell-EPS interactions. Recent progress of fundamental biofilm research has shed light on novel chemical biology strategies for biofilm control. In this article, chemical biology strategies targeting the bacterial intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways will be discussed.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Example of three QSIS systems. (A) In QSIS1, an engineered vector expressing the gene that encodes the toxic gene product under the control of LuxR was transformed to . (B) In QSIS2, the LasR-regulated promoter controls the expression of the gene, expression of which leads to cell death in the presence of sucrose. (C) The QSIS3 system is also based on LuxR regulation. The and genes, conferring kanamycin resistance and green fluorescence, respectively, are controlled by the repressor, which in turn is regulated by QS through the promoter. The system was established in . Figure adapted from Rasmussen et al. ( 10 ) with permission of the publisher. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015.f1

Source: microbiolspec August 2015 vol. 3 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Design and characterization of c-di-GMP biosensors. (a) Principle of synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP by DGCs and PDEs. (b) Construction of the genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors for c-di-GMP using MrkH and VCA0042. Both proteins contain a c-di-GMP binding PilZ domain and an N-terminal domain (NTD). (c, d) Fluorescence titration curves for cdg-S1 and cdg-S2. (e) Schematic illustration of the conformational change induced by binding c-di-GMP to cdg-S1 and cdg-S2. Figure adapted from Ho et al. ( 42 ) with permission of the publisher. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015.f2

Source: microbiolspec August 2015 vol. 3 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MB-0019-2015
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