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Growth and Differentiation Factors

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  • Author: Donald Metcalf†1
  • Editor: Siamon Gordon3
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: †Deceased.; 2: Cancer and Haematology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia; 3: Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Source: microbiolspec July 2016 vol. 4 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MCHD-0004-2015
  • Received 23 April 2015 Accepted 04 April 2016 Published 29 July 2016
  • Nicos A. Nicola, nicola@wehi.edu.au
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  • Abstract:

    This review is restricted to neutrophilic granulocytes (granulocytes), monocytes (macrophages), and eosinophils, with only passing reference to cells that are also usually included in the “myeloid” category—megakaryocytes, mast cells, and erythroid cells. Although some dendritic cells are of myeloid origin, they are discussed elsewhere. The validity of the information to be described depends on two assumptions: (a) that data are applicable to events and (b) that mouse data reflect events in man. Both assumptions are likely to be broadly correct.

  • Citation: Metcalf† D. 2016. Growth and Differentiation Factors. Microbiol Spectrum 4(4):MCHD-0004-2015. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MCHD-0004-2015.

Key Concept Ranking

Mast Cells
0.48544395
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
0.47317716
Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
0.46949893
Myeloid Dendritic Cells
0.4599216
Bone Marrow
0.43819898
0.48544395

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2016-07-29
2017-06-24

Abstract:

This review is restricted to neutrophilic granulocytes (granulocytes), monocytes (macrophages), and eosinophils, with only passing reference to cells that are also usually included in the “myeloid” category—megakaryocytes, mast cells, and erythroid cells. Although some dendritic cells are of myeloid origin, they are discussed elsewhere. The validity of the information to be described depends on two assumptions: (a) that data are applicable to events and (b) that mouse data reflect events in man. Both assumptions are likely to be broadly correct.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

When stimulated in culture, BL-CFCs can each produce large colonies containing a wide variety of committed progenitor cells in different lineages. Present in many colonies are also BL-CFCs, indicating a capacity of the initiating cells to self-generate and to sustain the continuous production of maturing progeny cells. CFU-s, colony-forming unit-spleen; E, erythroid progenitors; G, granulocyte progenitors; GM, granulocyte-macrophage progenitors; M, macrophage progenitors; Eo, eosinophil progenitors; Meg, megakaryocyte progenitors; DC, dendritic cell progenitors; T, T lymphocyte progenitors; B, B lymphocyte progenitors.

Source: microbiolspec July 2016 vol. 4 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MCHD-0004-2015
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Colony formation in 7-day cultures of C57BL mouse bone marrow cells stimulated by GM-CSF. Final concentration of GM-CSF in the 1:1 cultures was 10 ng/ml. The colony numbers ± standard deviations were derived from cultures of five different bone marrow cell populations.

Source: microbiolspec July 2016 vol. 4 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MCHD-0004-2015
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Colony formation by marrow cells from patients with acute or chronic myeloid leukemia using varying concentrations of material with colony-stimulating activity. The responsiveness of the leukemic cells to generate colonies (verified by karyotypic colony analysis) is broadly similar to that of normal human marrow cells, although some acute myeloid leukemia populations contained some cells capable of limited unstimulated proliferation.

Source: microbiolspec July 2016 vol. 4 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MCHD-0004-2015
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Tables

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TABLE 1

Colony-stimulating activity for mouse bone marrow cells of CSFs and other cytokines

Source: microbiolspec July 2016 vol. 4 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.MCHD-0004-2015

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