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Defining the Future of One Health

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  • Authors: Martyn Jeggo1, John S. Mackenzie2
  • Editors: Ronald M. Atlas3, Stanley Maloy4
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Geelong Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds Campus, Geelong, Victoria VIC 3220, Australia; 2: Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia WA 6012, Australia, and Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Victoria VIC 3004, Australia; 3: University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 4: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
  • Source: microbiolspec January 2014 vol. 2 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0007-2012
  • Received 14 September 2012 Accepted 21 December 2012 Published 31 January 2014
  • Correspondence: Martyn Jeggo martyn.jeggo@csiro.au
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  • Abstract:

    This paper recounts the history of One Health; the philosophy behind the initiative; and the current situation at the international, national, and regional level. It cites examples of where a One Health approach has successfully delivered.

  • Citation: Jeggo M, Mackenzie J. 2014. Defining the Future of One Health. Microbiol Spectrum 2(1):OH-0007-2012. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0007-2012.

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Clinical and Public Health
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References

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3. Shaw AM. 2009. Economics of zoonosis and their control, p 161–167. In Rushton J (ed), The Economics of Animal Health and Production. CABI, Wallingford, United Kingdom.
4. Cutler SJ, Fook AR, van der Poel WH. 2010. Public health threat of new, reemerging, and neglected zoonoses in the industrialized world. Emerg Infect Dis 16:1–7. [PubMed][CrossRef]
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6. de Haan C, Van Veen TS, Brandenburg B, Gauthier J, Le Gall F. 2001. Livestock Development: Implications for Rural Poverty, the Environment, and Global Food Security. World Bank, Washington, DC.
7. Atlas RM. 2012. One Health: its origins and future. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol [Epub ahead of print.] PMID: 22527177. [PubMed][CrossRef]
8. Jones KE, Patel NG, Levy MA, Storeygard A, Balk D, Gittleman JL, Daszak P. 2008. Global trends in emerging infectious diseases. Nature 451:990–993. [PubMed][CrossRef]
9. Rosenthal J. 2009. Climate change and the geographical distribution of infectious diseases. EcoHealth 6:489–495.
10. Vallat B. 2009. One World, One Health (editorial), p 1–2. OIE Bulletin no. 2. OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), Paris, France. http://www.oie.int/fileadmin/Home/eng/Publications_%26_Documentation/docs/pdf/bulletin/Bull_2009-2-ENG.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
11. Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC). 2009. Epidemics in a Changing World: Report of the Expert Working Group on Epidemics in a Changing World. PMSEIC, Canberra, New South Wales, Australia. http://www.innovation.gov.au/Science/PMSEIC/Documents/EpidemicsinaChangingWorld.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
12. Leboeuf A. 2011. Making Sense of One Health: Cooperating at the Human-Animal-Ecosystem Health Interface. Health and Environment Report no. 7. Institut Français des Relations Internationales, Paris, France. www.ifri.org/downloads/ifrihereport7alineleboeuf.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
13. Wang LF, Mackenzie JS, Broder CC. 2013. Henipaviruses, p 286–313. In Knipe DM, Howley PM (ed), Fields Virology, 6th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA.
14. Leong HK, Goh CS, Chew ST, Lim CW, Lin YN, Chang SF, Yap HH, Chua SB. 2008. Prevention and control of avian influenza in Singapore. Ann Acad Med Singapore 37:504–509. [PubMed]
15. Drew WL. 2004. Rabies, p 597–600. In Ryan KJ, Ray CG (ed), Sherris Medical Microbiology, 4th ed. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.
16. Hayes EB, Gubler DJ. 2006. West Nile virus: epidemiology and clinical features of an emerging epidemic in the United States. Annu Rev Med 57:181–194. [PubMed][CrossRef]
17. International Ministerial Conference on Animal and Pandemic Influenza. 2010. Hanoi Declaration. Animal and pandemic influenza: the way forward, Hanoi, Vietnam, 19-21 April 2010. International Ministerial Conference on Animal and Pandemic Influenza. http://www.unicef.org/influenzaresources/files/Hanoi_Declaration_21April_IMCAPI_Hanoi_2010.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
18. World Bank. 2010. People, Pathogens, and Our Planet: Volume One—Towards a One Health Approach for Controlling Zoonotic Diseases. World Bank, Washington, DC. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2844 (last accessed June 5, 2013).
19. Rweyemamu M, Kambarage D, Karimuribo E, Wambura P, Matee M, Kayembe JM, Mweene A, Neves L, Masumu J, Kasanga C, Hang’ombe B, Kayunze K, Misinzo G, Simuunza M, Paweska JT. 2012. Development of a One Health national capacity in Africa: the Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SACIDS) One Health Virtual Centre Model. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol [Epub ahead of print.] doi:10.1007/82_2012_244.
20. Gongal G. 2012. One Health approach in the South East Asia region: opportunities and challenges. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol [Epub ahead of print.] doi:10.1007/82_2012_242.
21. Batsukh Z, Tsolmon B, Otgonbaatar D, Undraa B, Dolgorkhand A, Ariuntuya O. 2012. One Health in Mongolia. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol [Epub ahead of print.] doi:10.1007/82_2012_253.
22. Coughlan B, Hall D. 2012. The development of One Health approaches in the Western Pacific. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol [Epub ahead of print.] doi:10.1007/82_2012_270.
23. French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs. 2011. Position française sur le concept “One Health/Une seule santé”: pour une approche intégrée de la santé face à la mondialisation des risques sanitaires. Strategic working document. Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, Paris, France. http://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/fr/IMG/pdf/Rapport_One_Health.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
24. Mackenzie JS, Jeggo MH. 2011. 1st International One Health Congress (editorial). EcoHealth 7:S1–S2.
25. One Health Global Network. 2011. Expert meeting on One Health Governance and Global Network. Stone Mountain One Health Conference USA. Atlanta report 2011. One Health Global Network. http://eeas.europa.eu/health/docs/2011_report-experts-atlanta_en.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
26. Chatham House. 2010. Meeting report. Shifting from emergency response to prevention of pandemic disease threats at source. Chatham House, London, United Kingdom. http://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/default/files/public/Research/Energy,%20Environment%20and%20Development/0410mtg_report.pdf (last accessed August 19, 2013).
27. Vink WD, McKenzie JS, Cogger N, Muellner P, Boreman B. 2013. Building a foundation for “One Health”: an education strategy for enhancing and sustaining national and regional capacity in endemic and emerging zoonotic disease management. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 366:in press.
28. Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). 2011. APEC One Health Action Plan. APEC, Singapore.
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2014-01-31
2017-09-22

Abstract:

This paper recounts the history of One Health; the philosophy behind the initiative; and the current situation at the international, national, and regional level. It cites examples of where a One Health approach has successfully delivered.

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Tables

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TABLE 1

The Manhattan Principles defining One Health

Source: microbiolspec January 2014 vol. 2 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0007-2012
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TABLE 2

Economic costs of recent disease outbreaks

Source: microbiolspec January 2014 vol. 2 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0007-2012
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TABLE 3

One Health concepts and principles

Source: microbiolspec January 2014 vol. 2 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0007-2012
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TABLE 4

One Health goals for Asian-Pacific countries

Source: microbiolspec January 2014 vol. 2 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0007-2012

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