1887
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.

Combating the Triple Threat: The Need for a One Health Approach

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    210.30 Kb
  • XML
    48.53 Kb
  • HTML
    65.64 Kb
  • Author: Lonnie J. King1
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; 2: University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Source: microbiolspec October 2013 vol. 1 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012
  • Received 19 November 2012 Accepted 09 December 2012 Published 31 October 2013
  • Lonnie J. King, Lonnie.king@cvm.osu.edu
image of Combating the Triple Threat: The Need for a One Health Approach
    Preview this microbiology spectrum article:
    Zoom in
    Zoomout

    Combating the Triple Threat: The Need for a One Health Approach, Page 1 of 2

    | /docserver/preview/fulltext/microbiolspec/1/1/OH-0012-2012-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/microbiolspec/1/1/OH-0012-2012-2.gif
  • Abstract:

    We live in a world that is rapidly changing, complex, and progressively interconnected. The convergence of people, animals, and their products embedded in an ever-changing environment has created a new dynamic. This dynamic is characterized by new threats to the health of humans, animals, and the environment. In addition, the health of each of these three domains is profoundly and inextricably linked and elaborately connected. Our interconnectedness strongly suggests that our future success in improving health will be based on a new integrative, holistic, and collaborative approach termed One Health. One Health demands that we work across professions, disciplines, and old boundaries. The challenges to our health are unique and profound, and old solutions to our new “wicked” problems are no longer as relevant or effective as in the past. The concept of One Health is not new but has reemerged as a concept to both better understand the triple threats to health and to better address these contemporary challenges using new approaches. This article discusses the health threats to each domain and calls for a new model to confront these challenges by shifting strategies and interventions upstream, closer to the origins of the threats. One Health is a new paradigm that can be used to improve the health of people, animals, and our environment as a collective rather than restricting our actions to any single domain.

  • Citation: King L. 2013. Combating the Triple Threat: The Need for a One Health Approach. Microbiol Spectrum 1(1):OH-0012-2012. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012.

References

1. Smolinski MS, Hamburg MA, Lederberg J (ed). 2003. Microbial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection and Response, p 19. National Academies Press, Washington, DC.
2. Taylor LH, Latham SM, Woolhouse ME. 2001. Risk factors for human disease emergence. Philos Trans R Soc London B Biol Sci 356:983989.
3. Brownlie J, Peckham C, Waage J, Woolhouse M, Lyall C, Meagher L, Tait J, Baylis M, Nicoll A. 2006. Foresight. Infectious Diseases: Preparing for the Future. Future Threats. Office of Science and Innovation, London, United Kingdom.
4. Camillus JC. 2008. Strategy as a wicked problem. Harvard Bus Rev 86:99106.
5. FAOSTAT. 2012. FAO statistical database. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy. http://faostat3.fao.org/home/index.html.
6. International Livestock Research Institute. 2012. Mapping of Poverty and Likely Zoonoses Hotspots. Zoonoses Project 4: Report to Department for International Development, UK, p 427. International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya.
7. Delgado C, Rosegrant M, Steinfeld F, Ehui S, Courbois C. 1999. Lifestock to 2020: the Next Food Revolution, p 112. Food, Agriculture and the Environment Discussion Paper 28. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC.
8. Florkowski WJ. 2008. Status and projections for foods imported into the United States, p 17. In Doyle MP, Erickson MC (ed), Imported Foods: Microbiological Issues and Challenges. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
9. Scallon E, Hoekstra RM, Angulo FJ, Tauxe RV, Widdowson MA, Roy SL, Jones JL, Griffin PM. 2011. Foodborne illness acquired in the United Statesmajor pathogens. Emerg Infect Dis 17:715.
10. Tauxe R. 2008. Roots of foodborne illness. Meeting report. New York Academy of Sciences, New York, NY.
11. Ostfeld RS. 2011. Lyme Disease: the Ecology of a Complex System, p 113143. Oxford University Press, New York, NY.
12. Wake DB, Vredenburg VT. 2008. Colloquium paper: are we in the midst of the sixth mass extinction? A view from the world of amphibians. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(Suppl 1):1146611473.
13. Specter M. 2012. The mosquito solution. The New Yorker (Annals of Science). July 9, 2012, 3840.
14. Kupferschmidt K. 2012. Mycology. Attack of the clones. Science 337:636638.
15. King LJ, Anderson LR, Blackmore CG, Blackwell MJ, Lautner EA, Marcus LC, Meyer TE, Monath TP, Nave JE, Ohle J, Pappaioanou M, Sobota J, Stokes WS, David RM, Glasser JH, Mahr RK. Executive summary of the AVMA One Health Initiative Task Force report. J Am Vet Med Assoc 233:259261.
16. Committee on Living Well with Chronic Disease: Public Health Action to Reduce Disability and Improve Functioning and Quality of Life. 2012. Living Well with Chronic Illness: A Call for Public Health Action. National Academies Press, Washington, DC.
17. Lederberg J. 2000. Infectious history. Science 288:287293.
18. Kuhn T. 1996. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 3rd ed, p 327. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL. First published 1962.
19. Reynolds HT, Barton HA. 2013. White-nose syndrome: human activity in the emergence of an extirpating mycosis. Microbiol Spectrum 1(1):OH-0008-2012. doi:10.1128/microbiolspectrum.OH-0008-2012.
20. Grace D, Mutua F, Ochungo P, Kruska R, Jones K, Brierley L, Lapar L, Said M, Herrero M, Phuc PM, Thao NB, Akuku I, Ogutu F. 2012. Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots. International Livestock Research Institute. http://hdl.handle.net/10568/21161.
microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012.citations
cm/1/1
content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012
Loading

Citations loading...

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012
2013-10-31
2017-12-12

Abstract:

We live in a world that is rapidly changing, complex, and progressively interconnected. The convergence of people, animals, and their products embedded in an ever-changing environment has created a new dynamic. This dynamic is characterized by new threats to the health of humans, animals, and the environment. In addition, the health of each of these three domains is profoundly and inextricably linked and elaborately connected. Our interconnectedness strongly suggests that our future success in improving health will be based on a new integrative, holistic, and collaborative approach termed One Health. One Health demands that we work across professions, disciplines, and old boundaries. The challenges to our health are unique and profound, and old solutions to our new “wicked” problems are no longer as relevant or effective as in the past. The concept of One Health is not new but has reemerged as a concept to both better understand the triple threats to health and to better address these contemporary challenges using new approaches. This article discusses the health threats to each domain and calls for a new model to confront these challenges by shifting strategies and interventions upstream, closer to the origins of the threats. One Health is a new paradigm that can be used to improve the health of people, animals, and our environment as a collective rather than restricting our actions to any single domain.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/microbiolspec/1/1/OH-0012-2012.html?itemId=/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

The domains and forces of One Health. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012.f1

Source: microbiolspec October 2013 vol. 1 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0012-2012
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error