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Making One Health a Reality—Crossing Bureaucratic Boundaries

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  • Authors: Carol Rubin1, Bernadette Dunham2, Jonathan Sleeman3
  • Editors: Ronald M. Atlas4, Stanley Maloy5
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333; 2: Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD 20855; 3: National Wildlife Health Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Madison, WI 53711; 4: University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 5: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
  • Source: microbiolspec January 2014 vol. 2 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0016-2012
  • Received 24 December 2012 Accepted 24 February 2013 Published 31 January 2014
  • C. Rubin, chr1@cdc.gov
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  • Abstract:

    A One Health approach requires that nontraditional partners with differing mandates collaborate and communicate effectively. Barriers to such redefined relationships range from personality and institutional cultural and value differences to impediments that require changes in agency-specific policies. This article reviews interagency One Health collaborations, nationally and internationally. It presents a series of case studies that describe situations in which barriers were overcome, thus culminating in successful One Health outcomes. The case studies illustrate challenges, tipping points, and externally enabling factors that help institutionalize cross-bureaucratic working relationships. Likewise, the cases demonstrate the added value of taking a One Health approach to solving (or preventing) public health problems.

  • Citation: Rubin C, Dunham B, Sleeman J. 2014. Making One Health a Reality—Crossing Bureaucratic Boundaries. Microbiol Spectrum 2(1):OH-0016-2012. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0016-2012.

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2014-01-31
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Abstract:

A One Health approach requires that nontraditional partners with differing mandates collaborate and communicate effectively. Barriers to such redefined relationships range from personality and institutional cultural and value differences to impediments that require changes in agency-specific policies. This article reviews interagency One Health collaborations, nationally and internationally. It presents a series of case studies that describe situations in which barriers were overcome, thus culminating in successful One Health outcomes. The case studies illustrate challenges, tipping points, and externally enabling factors that help institutionalize cross-bureaucratic working relationships. Likewise, the cases demonstrate the added value of taking a One Health approach to solving (or preventing) public health problems.

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