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Current Status of the Preharvest Application of Pro- and Prebiotics to Farm Animals to Enhance the Microbial Safety of Animal Products

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  • Authors: Rolf D. Joerger1, Arpeeta Ganguly2
  • Editors: Kalmia Kniel3, Siddhartha Thakur4
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716; 2: Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716; 3: Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 4: North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
  • Source: microbiolspec February 2017 vol. 5 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0012-2016
  • Received 05 January 2016 Accepted 30 November 2016 Published 10 February 2017
  • Rolf D. Joerger, rjoerger@udel.edu
image of Current Status of the Preharvest Application of Pro- and Prebiotics to Farm Animals to Enhance the Microbial Safety of Animal Products
  • Abstract:

    The selection of microorganisms that act as probiotics and feed additives that act as prebiotics is an ongoing research effort, but a sizable range of commercial pro-, pre- and synbiotic (combining pro- and prebiotics) products are already available and being used on farms. A survey of the composition of commercial products available in the United States revealed that , , and were the three most common species in probiotic products. Of the nearly 130 probiotic products (also called direct-fed microbials) for which information was available, about 50 also contained yeasts or molds. The focus on these particular bacteria and eukaryotes is due to long-standing ideas about the benefits of such strains, research data on effectiveness primarily in laboratory or research farm settings, and regulations that dictate which microorganisms or feed additives can be administered to farm animals. Of the direct-fed microbials, only six made a claim relating to food safety or competitive exclusion of pathogens. None of the approximately 50 prebiotic products mentioned food safety in their descriptions. The remainder emphasized enhancement of animal performance such as weight gain or overall animal health. The reason why so few products carry food safety-related claims is the difficulties in establishing unambiguous cause and effect relationships between the application of such products in varied and constantly changing farm environments and improved food safety of the end product.

  • Citation: Joerger R, Ganguly A. 2017. Current Status of the Preharvest Application of Pro- and Prebiotics to Farm Animals to Enhance the Microbial Safety of Animal Products. Microbiol Spectrum 5(1):PFS-0012-2016. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0012-2016.
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2017-02-10
2018-07-15

Abstract:

The selection of microorganisms that act as probiotics and feed additives that act as prebiotics is an ongoing research effort, but a sizable range of commercial pro-, pre- and synbiotic (combining pro- and prebiotics) products are already available and being used on farms. A survey of the composition of commercial products available in the United States revealed that , , and were the three most common species in probiotic products. Of the nearly 130 probiotic products (also called direct-fed microbials) for which information was available, about 50 also contained yeasts or molds. The focus on these particular bacteria and eukaryotes is due to long-standing ideas about the benefits of such strains, research data on effectiveness primarily in laboratory or research farm settings, and regulations that dictate which microorganisms or feed additives can be administered to farm animals. Of the direct-fed microbials, only six made a claim relating to food safety or competitive exclusion of pathogens. None of the approximately 50 prebiotic products mentioned food safety in their descriptions. The remainder emphasized enhancement of animal performance such as weight gain or overall animal health. The reason why so few products carry food safety-related claims is the difficulties in establishing unambiguous cause and effect relationships between the application of such products in varied and constantly changing farm environments and improved food safety of the end product.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Number of products entered in the Microbial Compendium ( 18 ) that contain particular bacteria or groups of bacteria. Abbreviations: L., ; B., ; Ped., ; Bif., ; Prop., ; E., .

Source: microbiolspec February 2017 vol. 5 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0012-2016
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Tables

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TABLE 1

List of microorganisms approved for use in DFBs in the United States and the European Union

Source: microbiolspec February 2017 vol. 5 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0012-2016

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