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Regulatory Issues Associated with Preharvest Food Safety: United States Perspective

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  • Authors: Shirley A. Micallef1, Robert L. Buchanan3
  • Editors: Kalmia E. Kniel5, Siddhartha Thakur6
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; 2: Center for Food Safety and Security Systems, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; 3: Center for Food Safety and Security Systems, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; 4: Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; 5: Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 6: North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
  • Source: microbiolspec July 2017 vol. 5 no. 4 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0016-2016
  • Received 13 December 2016 Accepted 07 June 2017 Published 28 July 2017
  • Shirley A. Micallef, smicall@umd.edu
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  • Abstract:

    The preharvest and preslaughter steps of food production constitute a first stage at which food can become contaminated with foodborne and toxigenic pathogens. Contamination at this early stage of food production can lead to amplification as food travels through the production and supply chain, accentuating the crucial need to address hazards and establish science-based metrics that are feasible to implement. This article discusses the preharvest food safety regulatory landscape in the United States, with a specific emphasis on fresh produce crops. Best practices, certification, audit schemes and challenges due to market channels, economies of scales, and grower behavior are considered in relation to the Food Safety Modernization Act. An outlook on the needs to facilitate implementation of the new law, develop educational programs for growers and stakeholders, and continue to better align food safety with environmental goals are presented.

  • Citation: Micallef S, Buchanan R. 2017. Regulatory Issues Associated with Preharvest Food Safety: United States Perspective. Microbiol Spectrum 5(4):PFS-0016-2016. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0016-2016.

Key Concept Ranking

Food Safety
0.44388127
Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis
0.43937853
Good Agricultural Practices
0.42198393
Good Handling Practices
0.42198393
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
0.40599048
0.44388127

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/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0016-2016
2017-07-28
2017-11-18

Abstract:

The preharvest and preslaughter steps of food production constitute a first stage at which food can become contaminated with foodborne and toxigenic pathogens. Contamination at this early stage of food production can lead to amplification as food travels through the production and supply chain, accentuating the crucial need to address hazards and establish science-based metrics that are feasible to implement. This article discusses the preharvest food safety regulatory landscape in the United States, with a specific emphasis on fresh produce crops. Best practices, certification, audit schemes and challenges due to market channels, economies of scales, and grower behavior are considered in relation to the Food Safety Modernization Act. An outlook on the needs to facilitate implementation of the new law, develop educational programs for growers and stakeholders, and continue to better align food safety with environmental goals are presented.

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