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Local Food Systems Food Safety Concerns

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  • Authors: Benjamin Chapman1, Chris Gunter2
  • Editors: Kalmia E. Kniel3, Siddhartha Thakur4
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Agricultural and Human Sciences, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695; 2: Department of Horticulture Sciences, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695; 3: Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 4: North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
  • Source: microbiolspec April 2018 vol. 6 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0020-2017
  • Received 06 October 2017 Accepted 22 January 2018 Published 13 April 2018
  • Benjamin Chapman, benjamin_chapman@ncsu.edu
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  • Abstract:

    Foodborne disease causes an estimated 48 million illnesses and 3,000 deaths annually (Scallan E, et al., 17:7–15, 2011), with U.S. economic costs estimated at $152 billion to $1.4 trillion annually (Roberts T, 89:1183–1188, 2007; Scharff RL, http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/reports/0001/01/01/healthrelated-costs-from-foodborne-illness-in-the-united-states, 2010). An increasing number of these illnesses are associated with fresh fruits and vegetables. An analysis of outbreaks from 1990 to 2003 found that 12% of outbreaks and 20% of outbreak-related illnesses were associated with produce (Klein S, Smith DeWaal CS, Center for Science in the Public Interest, https://cspinet.org/sites/default/files/attachment/ddreport.pdf, June 2008; Lynch M, Tauxe R, Hedberg C, 137:307–315, 2009). These food safety problems have resulted in various stakeholders recommending the shift to a more preventative and risk-based food safety system. A modern risk-based food safety system takes a farm-to-fork preventative approach to food safety and relies on the proactive collection and analysis of data to better understand potential hazards and risk factors, to design and evaluate interventions, and to prioritize prevention efforts. Such a system focuses limited resources at the points in the food system with the likelihood of having greatest benefit to public health. As shared kitchens, food hubs, and local food systems such as community supported agriculture are becoming more prevalent throughout the United States, so are foodborne illness outbreaks at these locations. At these locations, many with limited resources, food safety methods of prevention are rarely the main focus. This lack of focus on food safety knowledge is why a growing number of foodborne illness outbreaks are occurring at these locations.

  • Citation: Chapman B, Gunter C. 2018. Local Food Systems Food Safety Concerns. Microbiol Spectrum 6(2):PFS-0020-2017. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0020-2017.

References

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/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0020-2017
2018-04-13
2018-04-22

Abstract:

Foodborne disease causes an estimated 48 million illnesses and 3,000 deaths annually (Scallan E, et al., 17:7–15, 2011), with U.S. economic costs estimated at $152 billion to $1.4 trillion annually (Roberts T, 89:1183–1188, 2007; Scharff RL, http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/reports/0001/01/01/healthrelated-costs-from-foodborne-illness-in-the-united-states, 2010). An increasing number of these illnesses are associated with fresh fruits and vegetables. An analysis of outbreaks from 1990 to 2003 found that 12% of outbreaks and 20% of outbreak-related illnesses were associated with produce (Klein S, Smith DeWaal CS, Center for Science in the Public Interest, https://cspinet.org/sites/default/files/attachment/ddreport.pdf, June 2008; Lynch M, Tauxe R, Hedberg C, 137:307–315, 2009). These food safety problems have resulted in various stakeholders recommending the shift to a more preventative and risk-based food safety system. A modern risk-based food safety system takes a farm-to-fork preventative approach to food safety and relies on the proactive collection and analysis of data to better understand potential hazards and risk factors, to design and evaluate interventions, and to prioritize prevention efforts. Such a system focuses limited resources at the points in the food system with the likelihood of having greatest benefit to public health. As shared kitchens, food hubs, and local food systems such as community supported agriculture are becoming more prevalent throughout the United States, so are foodborne illness outbreaks at these locations. At these locations, many with limited resources, food safety methods of prevention are rarely the main focus. This lack of focus on food safety knowledge is why a growing number of foodborne illness outbreaks are occurring at these locations.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Cycle of pathogens in fresh fruit and vegetable production (source: reference 11 ).

Source: microbiolspec April 2018 vol. 6 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0020-2017
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Tables

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TABLE 1

Sources of pathogenic microorganisms for produce

Source: microbiolspec April 2018 vol. 6 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0020-2017
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TABLE 2

Comparing NOP to USDA GAPs

Source: microbiolspec April 2018 vol. 6 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0020-2017

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