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Understanding the Complexities of Food Safety Using a “One Health” Approach

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  • Authors: Kalmia E. Kniel1, Deepak Kumar2, Siddhartha Thakur3
  • Editors: Kalmia E. Kniel4, Siddhartha Thakur5
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716; 2: Department of Veterinary Public Health & Epidemiology, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand-263145, India; 3: Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607; 4: Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 5: North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
  • Source: microbiolspec February 2018 vol. 6 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0021-2017
  • Received 28 December 2017 Accepted 03 January 2018 Published 23 February 2018
  • Kalmia E. Kniel, [email protected]
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  • Abstract:

    The philosophy of One Health is growing in concept and clarity. The interdependence of human, animal, and environmental health is the basis for the concept of One Health. One Health is a comprehensive approach to ensure the health of people, animals, and the environment through collaborative efforts. Preharvest food safety issues align with the grand concept of One Health. Imagine any food production system, and immediately, parallel images from One Health emerge: for example, transmission of zoonotic diseases, antibiotic residues, or resistance genes in the environment; environmental and animal host reservoirs of disease; challenges with rearing animals and growing fresh produce on the same farm; application and transport of manure or diseased animals. During a recent celebration of #OneHealthDay, information was shared around the globe concerning scientists dedicated to One Health research systems. An ever-growing trade and global commerce system mixed with our incessant desire for food products during the whole year makes it all the more important to take a global view through the One Health lens to solve these growing challenges. The recent explosion of Zika virus around the globe renewed the need for assessing transmissible diseases through the eyes of One Health. It is not good enough to know how a disease affects the human population without a thorough understanding of the environment and vector reservoirs. If 60 to 75% of infectious diseases affecting humans are of animal origin, the need for better One Health research strategies and overdue solutions is imperative.

  • Citation: Kniel K, Kumar D, Thakur S. 2018. Understanding the Complexities of Food Safety Using a “One Health” Approach. Microbiol Spectrum 6(1):PFS-0021-2017. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0021-2017.

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/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0021-2017
2018-02-23
2018-09-25

Abstract:

The philosophy of One Health is growing in concept and clarity. The interdependence of human, animal, and environmental health is the basis for the concept of One Health. One Health is a comprehensive approach to ensure the health of people, animals, and the environment through collaborative efforts. Preharvest food safety issues align with the grand concept of One Health. Imagine any food production system, and immediately, parallel images from One Health emerge: for example, transmission of zoonotic diseases, antibiotic residues, or resistance genes in the environment; environmental and animal host reservoirs of disease; challenges with rearing animals and growing fresh produce on the same farm; application and transport of manure or diseased animals. During a recent celebration of #OneHealthDay, information was shared around the globe concerning scientists dedicated to One Health research systems. An ever-growing trade and global commerce system mixed with our incessant desire for food products during the whole year makes it all the more important to take a global view through the One Health lens to solve these growing challenges. The recent explosion of Zika virus around the globe renewed the need for assessing transmissible diseases through the eyes of One Health. It is not good enough to know how a disease affects the human population without a thorough understanding of the environment and vector reservoirs. If 60 to 75% of infectious diseases affecting humans are of animal origin, the need for better One Health research strategies and overdue solutions is imperative.

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Tables

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TABLE 1

Listing of select multistate outbreaks associated with fresh produce where preharvest contamination was suspected from 2006 to 2017

Source: microbiolspec February 2018 vol. 6 no. 1 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.PFS-0021-2017

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