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Tuberculous Otomastoiditis

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  • Authors: Jonathan M. Hand1, George A. Pankey3
  • Editor: David Schlossberg4
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Infectious Diseases, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70121; 2: The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Ochsner Clinical School, New Orleans, LA 70121; 3: Department of Infectious Diseases, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70121; 4: Philadelphia Health Department, Philadelphia, PA
  • Source: microbiolspec December 2016 vol. 4 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.TNMI7-0020-2016
  • Received 13 October 2016 Accepted 17 October 2016 Published 02 December 2016
  • George A. Pankey, gpankey@ochsner.org
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  • Abstract:

    Tuberculous otitis media and mastoiditis, or tuberculous otomastoiditis, is a rare but well-described infectious process occasionally affecting individuals in the United States but more frequently seen in countries where tuberculosis is endemic. Infection may be primary and occur through mucus aspirated through the Eustachian tube. Alternatively, organisms may secondarily infect the nasopharynx when expectorated from the lungs and, less frequently, may be hematogenously spread. Chronic otorrhea and hearing loss are common symptoms, and extensive perforation of the tympanic membranes and facial nerve paralysis are routinely described. Diagnosis is made by direct culture of , although more recently, molecular techniques have been used. Successful treatment of tuberculous otomastoiditis routinely involves surgical intervention combined with prolonged antituberculosis therapy.

  • Citation: Hand J, Pankey G. 2016. Tuberculous Otomastoiditis. Microbiol Spectrum 4(6):TNMI7-0020-2016. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.TNMI7-0020-2016.

Key Concept Ranking

Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha
0.49786565
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
0.46847823
Chronic Otitis Media
0.44021738
0.49786565

References

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3. Chirch LM, Ahmad K, Spinner W, Jimenez VE, Donelan SV, Smouha E. 2005. Tuberculous otitis media: report of 2 cases on Long Island, N.Y., and a review of all cases reported in the United States from 1990 through 2003. Ear Nose Throat J 84:488, 490, 492, passim. [PubMed]
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19. Tompkins KM, Reimers MA, White BL, Herce ME. 2016. Diagnosis of concurrent pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous otitis media confirmed by Xpert MTB/RIF in the United States. Infect Dis Clin Pract (Baltimore) 24:180–182. [PubMed]
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27. Diplan Rubio JM, Alarcón AV, Díaz MP, Vales O, Hinojosa R, Del Angel JM, Romero D, Sánchez Y. 2015. Neuro-otologic manifestations of tuberculosis. “The great imitator.” Am J Otolaryngol 36:467–471. [PubMed]
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2016-12-02
2017-11-20

Abstract:

Tuberculous otitis media and mastoiditis, or tuberculous otomastoiditis, is a rare but well-described infectious process occasionally affecting individuals in the United States but more frequently seen in countries where tuberculosis is endemic. Infection may be primary and occur through mucus aspirated through the Eustachian tube. Alternatively, organisms may secondarily infect the nasopharynx when expectorated from the lungs and, less frequently, may be hematogenously spread. Chronic otorrhea and hearing loss are common symptoms, and extensive perforation of the tympanic membranes and facial nerve paralysis are routinely described. Diagnosis is made by direct culture of , although more recently, molecular techniques have been used. Successful treatment of tuberculous otomastoiditis routinely involves surgical intervention combined with prolonged antituberculosis therapy.

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Tables

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TABLE 1

Frequencies of signs and symptoms in patients with tuberculous otomastoiditis

Source: microbiolspec December 2016 vol. 4 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.TNMI7-0020-2016

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