1887
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.

Recent Advances and Understanding of Using Probiotic-Based Interventions to Restore Homeostasis of the Microbiome for the Prevention/Therapy of Bacterial Diseases

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
Buy this Microbiology Spectrum Article
Price Non-Member $15.00
  • Authors: Jan S. Suchodolski1, Albert E. Jergens2
  • Editors: Indira T. Kudva3, Bryan H. Bellaire4
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845; 2: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010; 3: National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA; 4: Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
  • Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015
  • Received 24 August 2015 Accepted 16 September 2015 Published 08 April 2016
  • Jan S. Suchodolski, jsuchodolski@cvm.tamu.edu
image of Recent Advances and Understanding of Using Probiotic-Based Interventions to Restore Homeostasis of the Microbiome for the Prevention/Therapy of Bacterial Diseases
  • Abstract:

    The importance of the microbiome in health and disease has galvanized interest in using manipulations of the gastrointestinal ecosystem to prevent and/or combat gut bacterial infections and to restore mucosal homeostasis in patients with generalized microbial imbalances (i.e., dysbiosis), including the human inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis. Probiotics, prebiotics, or their combination use (i.e., synbiotics) are one mechanism for modifying the microbiota and exerting direct and indirect effects on the host immune responses and metabolomics profiles. These beneficial effects are transferred through various pathways, including the production of antimicrobial peptides, promoting the growth of beneficial microbes and enhancing immunomodulatory functions via various metabolites. While probiotic therapy has been used empirically for decades with mixed success, the recent advances in molecular and mass spectrophotometric techniques for the characterization of the complexity and diversity of the intestinal microbiome has aided in better understanding of host-microbe interactions. It is important to better understand the functional properties of the microbiome, because it is now clear that the microbiota secretes many metabolites that have a direct impact on host immune responses. This information will improve selection of the most appropriate probiotic strains that selectively target intestinal disease processes.

  • Citation: Suchodolski J, Jergens A. 2016. Recent Advances and Understanding of Using Probiotic-Based Interventions to Restore Homeostasis of the Microbiome for the Prevention/Therapy of Bacterial Diseases. Microbiol Spectrum 4(2):VMBF-0025-2015. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015.
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015
2016-04-08
2018-07-15

Abstract:

The importance of the microbiome in health and disease has galvanized interest in using manipulations of the gastrointestinal ecosystem to prevent and/or combat gut bacterial infections and to restore mucosal homeostasis in patients with generalized microbial imbalances (i.e., dysbiosis), including the human inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis. Probiotics, prebiotics, or their combination use (i.e., synbiotics) are one mechanism for modifying the microbiota and exerting direct and indirect effects on the host immune responses and metabolomics profiles. These beneficial effects are transferred through various pathways, including the production of antimicrobial peptides, promoting the growth of beneficial microbes and enhancing immunomodulatory functions via various metabolites. While probiotic therapy has been used empirically for decades with mixed success, the recent advances in molecular and mass spectrophotometric techniques for the characterization of the complexity and diversity of the intestinal microbiome has aided in better understanding of host-microbe interactions. It is important to better understand the functional properties of the microbiome, because it is now clear that the microbiota secretes many metabolites that have a direct impact on host immune responses. This information will improve selection of the most appropriate probiotic strains that selectively target intestinal disease processes.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Potential mechanisms for probiotic activity.

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Three-color FISH identifies mucosal bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa in a dog receiving probiotic VSL #3 as therapy for IBD. spp. appear orange (Erec482-Cy3 probe) against green (Eub338-FITC probe) and blue (DAPI stain) backgrounds.

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Clinical disorders associated with altered intestinal microbiota

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Practical considerations for FMT

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.VMBF-0025-2015

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error