1887

Chapter 29 : Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555816544/9781555812928_Chap29-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555816544/9781555812928_Chap29-2.gif

Abstract:

Siderophore-based methods could be successfully used for bacterial identification. Preliminary data for other bacteria (nonfluorescent species, species, rhizobia, and bradyrhizobia, as well as enterobacteria, mycobacteria, and species) strongly indicate that any siderophore could be used as a taxonomic marker for its producing bacteria, which means that the emerging concept of siderotyping as a taxonomic tool could be applied to a large part of the microbial world. Nonfluorescent siderophores produced by fluorescent pseudomonads, together with pyoverdines, e.g., pyochelin, salicylic acid, or quinolobactin, and other compounds such as those produced by nonfluorescent pseudomonads, e.g., ornibactins, cepabactin, or desferriferrioxamines, are revealed by an overlay of 1% melted agarose in CAS reagent, which reveals siderophores as yellow to pink spots appearing at the surface of the gel. It is clear that siderotyping could be very useful for bacterial identification and taxonomy: following the recognition of the type of pyoverdine it produces, a taxonomically undefined fluorescent pseudomonad is classified in a corresponding siderovar. The methods of siderotyping are very fast and easy to perform. The method has already proved its efficiency in the bacterial identification of fluorescent species and in the detection of new species. Depending on the specificity level expressed by the pyoverdine, it should thus be possible to achieve, during a single experimental step, both isolation and identification of a fluorescent strain.

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Structure of the pyoverdine. Reprinted from Fernandez et al., 2001, with permission from the publisher.

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Variations at the chromophore level as found in different pyoverdine-related compounds.

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

IEF patterns of pyoverdines produced by sp. strain LBSA1 (lane 1), CIP 59.27 (lane 2), ATCC 13525 (lane 3), CIP 73.25 (lane 4), CIP 75.23 (lane 5), CIP 103295 (lane 6), ATCC 17559 (lane 7), CIP 104377 (lane 8), CIP 106735 (lane 9), and the internal pH standard (lane 10). A convenient device for electrofocusing is the mini-IEF gel apparatus from Bio-Rad. Following the manufacturer's recommendations, 5% polyacrylamide gels (10 by 6.5 cm; 0.4 mm thick) containing commercially available ampholines (the large pH 3 to 10 range is the most useful) are freshly cast (within 1 h), loaded with 10 to 20 samples (usually 1 _l of a 20 fold-concentrated CAA culture supernatant or 1 μl of a 5 mM purified siderophore aqueous solution), and electrophoresed for 15 min at 100 V, 15 min at 200 V, and 1 h at 450 V. The bright fluorescent pyoverdine bands are detected during exposure of the samples to UV light (350 nm).

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Heterologous pyoverdine-mediated 59Fe incorporation in CFBP 5705. Values on the ordinate correspond to the percentage of 59Fe incorporation after 20 min of incubation, compared to the homologous system. Numbers 1 to 35 on the abscissa correspond to the different pyoverdines tested, originating from the following bacterial strains: 1, sp. strain E8; 2, ATCC 19310; 3, 9AW; 4, ATCC 12633; 5, 51W; 6, , Pa6; 7, CCM 2798; 8, CHA0; 9, LMG 2342; 10, ATCC 27853; 11, ii; 12, SB8.3; 13, ATCC 17400; 14, 1.3; 15, sp. strain 267; 16, ATCC 13525; 17, ATCC 15692; 18, 18.1; 19, 12; 20, CFBP 2392; 21, CFBP 2461; 22, sp. strain ATCC 15915; 23, CFML 90–54; 24, CFML 90–77; 25, CFML 92–104; 26, CFML 90–33; 27, sp. strain CFML 90–40; 28, sp. strain CFML 90–42; 29, sp. strain CFML 90–51; 30, sp. strain CFML 90.52; 31, sp. strain 7SR1; 32, sp. strain 2908; 33, sp. strain A214; 34, ; 35, CFBP 5705.

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555816544.chap29
1. Anzai, Y.,, H. Kim,, J.-Y. Park,, H. Wakabayashi,, and H. Oyaizu. 2000. Phylogenic affiliation of the pseudomonads based on 16S rRNA sequence. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 50: 1563 1589.
2. Böckmann, M.,, K. Taraz,, and H. Budzikiewicz. 1997. Biogenesis of the pyoverdine chromophore. Z. Naturforsch. 52C: 319 324.
3. Bossis, E.,, P. Lemanceau,, X. Latour,, and L. Gardan. 2000. The taxonomy of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida: current status and need for revision. Agronomie 20: 51 63.
4. Budzikiewicz, H. 2004. Siderophores of the Pseudomonadaceae sensu stricto (fluorescent and non-fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.). Prog. Chem. Org. Nat. Prod. 87: 81 237.
5. Fernandez, D. U.,, R. Fuchs,, K. Taraz,, H. Budzikiewicz,, P. Munsch,, and J.-M. Meyer. 2001. The structure of a pyoverdine produced by a Pseudomonas tolaasii-like isolate. BioMetals 14: 81 84.
6. Fuchs, R.,, M. Schäfer,, V. Geoffroy,, and J.-M. Meyer. 2001. Siderotyping: a powerful tool for the characterization of pyoverdines. Curr. Top. Med. Chem. 1: 31 35.
7. Gardan, L.,, P. Bella,, J.-M. Meyer,, R. Christen,, P. Rott,, W. Achouak,, and R. Samson. 2002. Pseudomonas salomonii sp. nov., pathogenic on garlic, and Pseudomonas palleroniana sp. nov., isolated from rice. Int. J. Syst. Env. Microbiol. 52: 2065 2074.
8. Georges, C.,, and J.-M. Meyer. 1995. High-molecular- mass, iron-repressed cytoplasmic proteins in fluorescent Pseudomonas: potential peptide-synthetases for pyoverdine biosynthesis. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 132: 9 15.
9. Hohnadel, D.,, and J.-M. Meyer. 1988, Specificity of pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake among fluorescent Pseudomonas strains. J. Bacteriol. 170: 4865 4873.
10. Kersters, K.,, W. Ludwig,, M. Vancanneyt,, P. Devos,, M. Gillis,, and K. H. Schleifer. 1996. Recent changes in the classification of pseudomonads: an overview. Syst. Appl. Microbiol. 19: 465 477.
11. Kleinkauf, H.,, and H. von Dörhen. 1996. A nonribosomal system of peptide biosynthesis. Eur. J. Biochem. 236: 335 351.
12. Koedam, N.,, E. Wittouck,, A. Gaballa,, A. Gillis,, M. Höfte,, and P. Cornelis. 1994. Detection and differentiation of microbial siderophores by isoelectric focusing and chrome azurol S overlay. BioMetals 7: 287 291.
13. Konz, D.,, and M. A. Marahiel. 1999. How do peptide synthetases generate structural diversity? Chem. Biol. 6: R39 R48.
14. Lehoux, D.E.,, F. Sanschagrin,, and R.C. Levesque. 2000. Genomics of the 35-kb pvd locus and analysis of novel pvdIJK genes implicated in pyoverdine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 190: 141 146.
15. Maurer, B.,, A. Müller,, W. Keller-Schierlein,, and H. Zähner. 1968. Ferribactin, ein Siderochrom aus Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula. Arch. Microbiol. 60: 326 329.
16. Merriman, T.R.,, M.E. Merriman,, and I.L. Lamont. 1995. Nucleotide sequence of pvdD, a pyoverdine biosynthetic gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: PvdD has similarity to peptide synthetases. J. Bacteriol. 177: 252 258.
17. Meyer, J.-M. 2000. Pyoverdines: pigments, siderophores and potential taxonomic markers of fluorescent Pseudomonas species. Arch. Microbiol. 174: 2745 2753.
18. Meyer, J.-M.,, A. Stintzi,, V. Coulanges,, S. Shivaji,, J.A. Voss,, K. Taraz,, and H. Budzikiewicz. 1998. Siderotyping of fluorescent pseudomonads: characterization of pyoverdines of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida strains from Antarctica. Microbiology 144: 3119 3126.
19. Meyer, J.-M.,, V.A. Geoffroy,, N. Baida,, L. Gardan,, D. Izard,, P. Lemanceau,, W. Achouak,, and N. Palleroni. 2002. Siderophore typing, a powerful tool for the identification of fluorescent and nonfluorescent pseudomonads. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68: 2745 2753.
20. Meyer, J.-M.,, V. A. Geoffroy,, C. Baysse,, P. Cornelis,, I. Barelmann,, K. Taraz,, and H. Budzikiewicz. 2002. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in fluorescent Pseudomonas: characterization of the pyoverdine-receptor binding site of three cross-reacting pyoverdines. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 397: 179 183.
21. Mossialos, D.,, U. Ochsner,, C. Baysse,, P. Chablain,, J.-P. Pirnay,, N. Koedam,, H. Budzikiewicz,, D. U. Fernandez,, M. Schäfer,, J. Revel,, and P. Cornelis. 2002. Identification of new, conserved, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases from fluorescent pseudomonads involved in the biosynthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Mol. Microbiol. 45: 1673 1685.
22. Munsch, P.,, T. Alatossava,, N. Marttinen,, J.-M. Meyer,, R. Christen,, and L. Gardan. 2002. Pseudomonas costantinii sp. nov., another causal agent of brown blotch disease, isolated from cultivated mushroom sporophores in Finland. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 52: 1973 1983.
23. Palleroni, N. J., 1984. Pseudomonas, p. 141 199. In N. R. Krieg, and J. G. Holt (ed.), Bergey’s Manual of Systematic bacteriology, vol. 1, The Williams & Wilkins Co., Baltimore, Md.
24. Quadri, L. E. 2000. Assembly of aryl-capped siderophores by modular peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases. Mol. Microbiol. 37: 1 12.
25. Ravel, J.,, and P. Cornelis. 2003. Genomics of pyoverdine- mediated iron uptake in pseudomonads. Trends Microbiol. 11: 195 200.
26. Vandamme, P.,, B. Pot,, M. Gillis,, P. De Vos,, K. Kersters,, and J. Swings. 1996. Polyphasic taxonomy, a consensus approach to bacterial systematics. Microbiol. Rev. 60: 407 438.

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Possible side chains of pyoverdine isoforms

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Amino acid composition of the peptidic part of 44 pyoverdines with fully determined structures

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Examples of structurally related pyoverdines demonstrating cross-reactivity in pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Generic image for table
TABLE 4

Correlation between siderotype and species

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29
Generic image for table
TABLE 5

The most common siderotypes and their corresponding siderovars found in 28 bacterial collections of diverse environmental origins representing 1,340 fluorescent isolates

Citation: Meyer J, Geoffroy V. 2004. Environmental Fluorescent and Pyoverdine Diversity: How Siderophores Could Help Microbiologists in Bacterial Identification and Taxonomy, p 451-468. In Crosa J, Mey A, Payne S, Iron Transport in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816544.ch29

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error