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Chapter 4 : Pathogens of Hamsters

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Abstract:

Hamsters are used in several areas of biomedical research, including infectious diseases, endocrinology, nutrition, reproduction, behavior, ophthalmology, olfaction, and others. At least eight species of hamster have served as research subjects. The Syrian hamster is the most widely used hamster in biomedical research, although Chinese hamster cells are also widely used for in vitro research. Human outbreaks have been associated with hamsters purchased as pets, suggesting that some commercial vendors of laboratory hamsters are potential sources of infection for laboratory workers. Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), an ssRNA virus, is one of the two member of the genus , of the family . It is likely that even clinically unapparent, enzootic infection of hamsters would confound research involving the immune and/or respiratory systems. Natural infection of laboratory hamsters would likely alter the findings of studies involving the cardiovascular and enterohepatic systems, and possibly the lymphoreticular system. Careful attention to fomite or vector transmission is necessary to prevent reinfection, or infection from contaminated mouse colonies. As other rodents are often the source of infection for hamsters, efforts to prevent introduction of oxyurids into the hamster colony should also be directed at controlling infection in those species.

Citation: Baker D. 2003. Pathogens of Hamsters, p 115-127. In Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817824.ch4
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Tables

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TABLE 4-1

Body systems known or likely to be affected by pathogen indicated

Citation: Baker D. 2003. Pathogens of Hamsters, p 115-127. In Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817824.ch4

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