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Chapter 84 : Efficacy of Copper-Silver Ionization in Controlling in a Hospital Hot Water Distribution System: a German Experience

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Abstract:

This chapter evaluates the efficacy of copper-silver ionization that is reported to be a useful tool to control growth of . Copper-silver ionization was tested over a period of 1 year as the first step in a multiple-barrier system controlling . In Germany, additions of silver and copper to drinking water need special approval of the Ministry of Health and are permitted only with substantial restrictions. Measurable effects in reduction can be achieved only at silver concentrations significantly exceeding the German standard of 10 μg/liter. Copper values exceeded national standards, preventing a short-term high dosing of silver. Concentrations of both metals vary depending on water flow. Silver cannot be analyzed directly with in the system, causing a considerable feedback delay. counts stayed above targeted values (working standard, counts <1 CFU/ml) . Reduction is not as efficacious as in hot water systems maintaining about 60№C. Long-term effects (e.g., development of heavy-metal resistance) of adding silver and copper are yet to be evaluated.

Citation: Mathys W, Hohmann C, Junge-Mathys E. 2002. Efficacy of Copper-Silver Ionization in Controlling in a Hospital Hot Water Distribution System: a German Experience, p 419-424. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch84
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Effect of silver-copper ionization on silver concentrations in a German hospital's hot water system. Phase 0, period before installation of unit; phase 1, period after starting ionization; phase 2/3, period after first/second cleaning of electrodes; phase 4, period after feeding the unit with softened water; phase 5, after third cleaning of electrodes; phase 6, after deactivating and removing unit.

Citation: Mathys W, Hohmann C, Junge-Mathys E. 2002. Efficacy of Copper-Silver Ionization in Controlling in a Hospital Hot Water Distribution System: a German Experience, p 419-424. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch84
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Effect of silver-copper ionization on counts in a German hospital's hot water system. Phase 0, period before installation of unit; phase 1, period after starting ionization; phase 2/3, period after first/second cleaning of electrodes; phase 4, period after feeding the unit with softened water; phase 5, after third cleaning of electrodes; phase 6, after deactivating and removing unit.

Citation: Mathys W, Hohmann C, Junge-Mathys E. 2002. Efficacy of Copper-Silver Ionization in Controlling in a Hospital Hot Water Distribution System: a German Experience, p 419-424. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch84
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References

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1. Biurrun, A.,, L. Caballero,, C. Pelaz,, E. Leon,, and A. Gago. 1999. Treatment of a Legionella pneumophila-colonized water distribution system using copper-silver ionization and continuous chlorination. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 20: 426 428.
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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Summary statistics of counts, silver, and copper levels in a German hospital's hot water system

Citation: Mathys W, Hohmann C, Junge-Mathys E. 2002. Efficacy of Copper-Silver Ionization in Controlling in a Hospital Hot Water Distribution System: a German Experience, p 419-424. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch84

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