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Chapter 3 : Sallie “Penny” Chisholm and Oceans of

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Abstract:

Sallie “Penny” Chisholm is a U.S. biological oceanographer and Institute Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). An expert in microbial ecology and evolution, she is known for discovering the marine bacterium , the tiniest and most abundant photosynthetic organism on the planet. Her work has been recognized with many honors and awards, including membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 2004 and a National Medal of Science awarded to her by President Barack Obama in 2011. Chisholm began as the only female biologist in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT. She has advocated for the equal employment of female professors in the sciences and has inspired women through her persistence and devotion to her research. New generations of aspiring biologists can engage with her work through her series of children’s books on photosynthesis. After decades of work, Chisholm has accumulated many individual accomplishments, but it is through her mentorship and the collective achievements of the scientists she has inspired that her character truly shines.

Citation: Rowland S, Klepac-Ceraj V. 2018. Sallie “Penny” Chisholm and Oceans of , p 19-27. In Whitaker R, Barton H (ed), Women in Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819545.ch3
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Figure 1

Photo of Dr. Chisholm in her lab.

Citation: Rowland S, Klepac-Ceraj V. 2018. Sallie “Penny” Chisholm and Oceans of , p 19-27. In Whitaker R, Barton H (ed), Women in Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819545.ch3
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References

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1. Chisholm SW,, Olson RJ,, Zettler ER,, Goericke R,, Waterbury JB,, Welschmeyer NA . 1988. A novel free-living prochlorophyte abundant in the oceanic euphotic zone. Nature 334 : 340 343.
2. Biller SJ,, Coe A,, Chisholm SW . 2016. Torn apart and reunited: impact of a heterotroph on the transcriptome of Prochlorococcus. ISME J 10 : 2831 2843.
3. Committee on Women Faculty at Massachusetts Institute of Technology . 1999. A Study on the Status of Women Faculty in Science at MIT. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. http://web.mit.edu/fnl/women/women.pdf.
4. Rocap G,, Larimer FW,, Lamerdin J,, Malfatti S,, Chain P,, Ahlgren NA,, Arellano A,, Coleman M,, Hauser L,, Hess WR,, Johnson ZI,, Land M,, Lindell D,, Post AF,, Regala W,, Shah M,, Shaw SL,, Steglich C,, Sullivan MB,, Ting CS,, Tolonen A,, Webb EA,, Zinser ER,, Chisholm SW . 2003. Genome divergence in two Prochlorococcus ecotypes reflects oceanic niche differentiation. Nature 424 : 1042 1047.
5. Biller SJ,, Berube PM,, Lindell D,, Chisholm SW . 2015. Prochlorococcus: the structure and function of collective diversity. Nat Rev Microbiol 13 : 13 27.
6. Sullivan MB,, Waterbury JB,, Chisholm SW . 2003. Cyanophages infecting the oceanic cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus. Nature 424 : 1047 1051.
7. Wanucha G . 2014. Women in marine science seize the day. Oceans at MIT. http://oceans.mit.edu/news/featured-stories/women-marine-science. Accessed 10 January 2018.

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