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A Retrospective Look at 20 Years of ASM Education Programs (1990–2010) and a Prospective Look at the Next 20 Years (2011–2030)

    Author: Amy Chang1,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC, 20036-2904
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 19 May 2011
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: American Society for Microbiology, 1752 N Street NW, Washington, DC, 20036-2904. Phone: 202-942-9264. Fax: 202-942-9329. E-mail: [email protected].
    • Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2011 vol. 12 no. 1 8-12. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.253
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    Abstract:

    Professional societies provide visibility and legitimacy to the work of their post secondary educator members, advocate best practices in courses and sponsored student research, and establish deep networks and communities that catalyze members to collectively engage in undergraduate teaching and learning scholarship. Within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the Education Board, established in the mid-1970s, assumes this role. I have been fortunate enough to watch several pivotal programs support our growth and change the status quo by providing opportunities for biology educators to flourish. In this retrospective review, the background and details I offer about each initiative help explain ASM Education offerings, how our growth has been supported and how the status quo has changed. In this prospective look, I offer my vision of the future in post secondary education where classroom learning is student-centered and focused on global problems affecting our health and environment. For the profession to proliferate, the ASM must provide members as many opportunities in learning biology as they do with advancing biology to new frontiers.

Key Concept Ranking

Infectious Diseases
0.40246752
0.40246752

References & Citations

1. AAAS 2009 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: A call to action American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, DC Available from: www.visionandchange.org
2. Anonymous 2010 Educators share best practices and student-learning research at ASMCUE 2010 Microbe 5 353 354
3. ASM 1993 ASM establishes new division for educators ASM News 59 407
4. ASM 1998 BET receives national award for curriculum project ASM News 64 158 160
5. ASM 2000 ASM launches education periodical ASM News 66 300 301
6. ASM 2000 BET recognized for scholarship of teaching in microbiology ASM News 66 158
7. ASM 1997 ASM fellowship program grows and diversifies ASM News 63 37 38
8. ASM 1993 ASM takes major step in infectious disease training ASM News 59 623 624
9. ASM 2000 BET awarded $1.5 million to manage student symposium ASM News 66 623 624
10. ASM 2000 President Clinton recognizes BET for excellence in mentoring ASM News 66 748 750
11. Boyer E 1990 Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching New York, NY
12. Cardinale J 2010 Get published! Introducing the “2.0” versions of JMBE and MicrobeLibrary Microbe 5 225 226
13. Committee on a New Biology for the 21st Century: Ensuring the United States Leads the Coming Biology Revolution; National Research Council 2009 A new biology for the 21st Century The National Academies Press Washington, DC
14. Douthwright Jean 1994 Undergraduate microbiology curriculum recommendations ASM News 60 460 461
15. Fleming ND, Mills C 1992 Not another inventory, rather a catalyst for reflection To Improve the Academy 11 137 149 Available from: http://www.ntlf.com/html/lib/suppmat/74fleming.htm
16. Herring Teresa 1991 Science education: Life science societies take up the gauntlet ASM News 57 254 257
17. Herring Teresa 1992 Coalition for Education in the Life Sciences sets national agenda ASM News 58 322 325
18. Johnson L, Levine A, Smith R, Stone S 2010 The 2010 Horizon Report The New Media Consortium Austin, TX Available from: http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2010-Horizon-Report.pdf
19. Lund H 2004 Learning styles and pedagogy in post-16 learning: A systematic and critical review Learning and Skills Research Centre London England Available from: http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/edskas/learning%20styles.pdf

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.253
2011-05-19
2019-10-18

Abstract:

Professional societies provide visibility and legitimacy to the work of their post secondary educator members, advocate best practices in courses and sponsored student research, and establish deep networks and communities that catalyze members to collectively engage in undergraduate teaching and learning scholarship. Within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the Education Board, established in the mid-1970s, assumes this role. I have been fortunate enough to watch several pivotal programs support our growth and change the status quo by providing opportunities for biology educators to flourish. In this retrospective review, the background and details I offer about each initiative help explain ASM Education offerings, how our growth has been supported and how the status quo has changed. In this prospective look, I offer my vision of the future in post secondary education where classroom learning is student-centered and focused on global problems affecting our health and environment. For the profession to proliferate, the ASM must provide members as many opportunities in learning biology as they do with advancing biology to new frontiers.

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