1887

Guided Inquiry and Consensus-Building Used to Construct Cellular Models

    Author: Joel I. Cohen1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Parkland Magnet Middle School, Rockville, MD 20853
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2015
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Parkland Magnet Middle School, 4610 West Frankfort Drive, Rockville, MD 20853. Phone: 301-438-5700. Fax: 301-460-2699. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 41-49. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.809
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    Abstract:

    Using models helps students learn from a “whole systems” perspective when studying the cell. This paper describes a model that employs guided inquiry and requires consensus building among students for its completion. The model is interactive, meaning that it expands upon a static model which, once completed, cannot be altered and additionally relates various levels of biological organization (molecular, organelle, and cellular) to define cell and organelle function and interaction. Learning goals are assessed using data summed from final grades and from images of the student’s final cell model (plant, bacteria, and yeast) taken from diverse seventh grade classes. Instructional figures showing consensus-building pathways and seating arrangements are discussed. Results suggest that the model leads to a high rate of participation, facilitates guided inquiry, and fosters group and individual exploration by challenging student understanding of the living cell.

Key Concept Ranking

Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum
0.55672157
Endoplasmic Reticulum
0.46331424
Amino Acid Addition
0.45464334
0.55672157

References & Citations

1. Ausubel DP 1968 Educational psychology: a cognitive view Holt, Rinehart and Winston New York, NY
2. Bushell J 2001 A model of the ultrastructure of a cell J Biol Educ 35 3 152 153 10.1080/00219266.2001.9655765 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00219266.2001.9655765
3. Dambekalns L, Medina-Jerez W 2012 Cell organelles and silk batik: a model for integrating art and science Sci Scope 36 2 44 51
4. diCarlo SE 2006 Cell biology should be taught as science is practiced Nature 7 290 295
5. Driver R, Squires A, Rushworth P, Wood-Robinson V 1994 Making sense of secondary science: research into children’s ideas 224 Routledge London, UK, and New York, NY
6. Grady K, Jeanpierre B 2011 Tried and true: population 75 trillion—cells, organelles, and their functions Sci Scope 34 5 64 69
7. Harris CJ, Rooks DL 2010 Managing inquiry-based science: challenges in enacting complex science instruction in elementary and middle school classrooms J Sci Teach Educ 21 227 240 10.1007/s10972-009-9172-5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10972-009-9172-5
8. Lehrer R, Schauble L 2006 Cultivating model-based reasoning in science education 371 388 Sawyer K Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences Cambridge University Press Cambridge, MA
9. Minogue J, Jones G, Broadwell B, Oppewal T 2006 Exploring cells from the inside out: new tools for the classroom Sci Scope 29 6 28 32
10. NGSS Lead States 2013 Next generation science standards: for states, by states The National Academies Press Washington, DC
11. Palombi PS, Jagger KS 2003 Learning about cells as dynamic entities: an inquiry-driven cell culture project Bioscene 34 2 27 33
12. Pollard TD 2013 No question about exciting questions in cell biology PLoS Biol 11 12 e1001734 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001734 24348201 3859671 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001734
13. Saunders C, Taylor A 2014 Close the textbook & open “The cell: an image library.” Am. Biol. Teach. 76 3 201 207 10.1525/abt.2014.76.3.9 http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.3.9
14. Schwarz C, Passmore C 2012 Preparing for NGSS: developing and using models NSTA Web Seminars September 25
15. Tibell LEA, Rundgren C-J 2010 Educational challenges of molecular life science: characteristics and implications for education and research CBE Life Sci. Educ. Spring 9 1 25 33 10.1187/cbe.08-09-0055 20194805 2830159 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.08-09-0055
16. Waldron I 2011 Cells as molecular factories 2 Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. [Online.] http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/bioactivities.
17. Waldron I 2013 Cell Structure and function—major concepts and learning activities 1 6 [Online.] http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/bioactivities.
18. Wright R, Boggs J 2002 Learning cell biology as a team: a project-based approach to upper division cell biology Cell Biol Educ 1 145 153 10.1187/cbe.02-03-0006 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.02-03-0006

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2015-05-01
2019-08-21

Abstract:

Using models helps students learn from a “whole systems” perspective when studying the cell. This paper describes a model that employs guided inquiry and requires consensus building among students for its completion. The model is interactive, meaning that it expands upon a static model which, once completed, cannot be altered and additionally relates various levels of biological organization (molecular, organelle, and cellular) to define cell and organelle function and interaction. Learning goals are assessed using data summed from final grades and from images of the student’s final cell model (plant, bacteria, and yeast) taken from diverse seventh grade classes. Instructional figures showing consensus-building pathways and seating arrangements are discussed. Results suggest that the model leads to a high rate of participation, facilitates guided inquiry, and fosters group and individual exploration by challenging student understanding of the living cell.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

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FIGURE 1.

Pathway and steps used for guided inquiry and consensus-building while constructing model cells.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 41-49. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.809
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Image of FIGURE 2.

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FIGURE 2.

Eight table groups of four students each, identified by organism, and showing their matching tables used in participatory cellular communication and exchange.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 41-49. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.809
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3.

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FIGURE 3.

Student-generated cell model of plant cells.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 41-49. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.809
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4.

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FIGURE 4.

Student-generated model of yeast cells.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 41-49. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.809
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 5.

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FIGURE 5.

Student-generated model of bacterial cells.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 41-49. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.809
Download as Powerpoint

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