1887

Facilitating Improvements in Laboratory Report Writing Skills with Less Grading: A Laboratory Report Peer-Review Process

    Authors: Jennifer R. Brigati1,*, Jerilyn M. Swann1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Maryville College, Maryville, TN 37804
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2015
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Maryville College, 502 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy, Maryville, TN 37804. Phone: 865-981-8168. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 61-68. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • HTML
    51.65 Kb
  • PDF
    271.43 Kb
  • XML

    Abstract:

    Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. -tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other ( = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading). -tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone ( = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading). While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions) in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings.

Key Concept Ranking

Transformation
1.0627463
DNA
1.05
Plasmids
1.0
1.0627463

References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action: a summary of recommendations made at a national conference organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science July 15–17 2009 Washington, DC
2. Berry D, Fawkes K 2010 Constructing the components of a lab report using peer review J Chem Educ 87 57 61 10.1021/ed8000107 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ed8000107
3. Flynn EA, McCulley GA, Gratz RK 1986 Writing in biology: effect of peer critiquing and model analysis on the quality of biology student laboratory reports 160 175 Young A, Fulwiler T Writing Across the Disciplines: Research into Practice Boynton/Cook Publishers Upper Montclair, NJ
4. Gratz RK 1990 Improving lab report quality by model analysis, peer review, and revision J Coll Sci Teach 19 292 295
5. Gray FE, Emerson L, MacKay B 2005 Meeting the demands of the workplace; science students and written skills J Sci Ed Tech 14 425 434 10.1007/s10956-005-8087-y http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10956-005-8087-y
6. Gray K 2013 The candidate skills/qualities employers want, Figure 41 Job Outlook 2014 National Association of Colleges and Employers Bethlehem, PA
7. Haury DL 1993 Teaching science through inquiry. ERCI/CSMEE Digest ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education Columbus, OH ERIC # ED359048
8. Leekley RM, Davis-Kahl S, Seeborg MC 2013 Undergraduate economics journal: learning by doing J. Coll. Teach. Learn 10 105 112
9. Lord T 2001 101 Reasons for using cooperative learning in biology teaching Am Biol Teach 63 30 38 10.2307/4451027 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4451027
10. Sims G 1989 A student peer review in the classroom: a teaching and grading tool J Agron Educ 18 105 108

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884
2015-05-01
2019-10-16

Abstract:

Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. -tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other ( = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading). -tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone ( = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading). While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions) in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/16/1/jmbe-16-61.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

Click to view

FIGURE 1.

Average lab report grades (before adjustments) of student pairs and individuals. No statistically significant differences were found between average grades of students working in pairs and students working as individuals on any single lab report or all lab reports combined. (two-tailed -test; = 0.45 for report 1; = 0.61 for report 2; = 0.64 for report 3; = 0.98 for all reports). Error bars indicate standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 61-68. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2.

Click to view

FIGURE 2.

Average improvement of individual-student and student-pair lab report grades between the first lab report and the third (final) lab report. There was no statistically significant difference in improvement between the two groups (two-tailed -test, = 0.11). Error bars indicate standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 61-68. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3.

Click to view

FIGURE 3.

Comparison of average grades calculated by evaluating individual lab reports with grades calculated by evaluating one laboratory report per group of four students. No statistically significant difference was found between average individual and group grades (two-tailed -test; = 0.12). Error bars indicate standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 61-68. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error