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Use of Constructed-Response Questions to Support Learning of Cell Biology during Lectures

    Author: Foong May Yeong1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2015
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597. Phone: +65 6516-8866. Fax: +65 6790-1453. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 87-89. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.890
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    Abstract:

    The use of class-response systems such as the Clickers to promote active-learning during lectures has been wide-spread. However, the often-used MCQ format in class activities as well as in assessments for large classes might lower students’ expectations and attitudes towards learning. Here, I describe my experience converting MCQs to constructed-response questions for in-class learning activities by removing cues from the MCQs. From the responses submitted, students seemed capable of providing answers without the need for cues. Using class-response systems such as Socrative for such constructed-response questions could be useful to challenge students to express their ideas in their own words. Moreover, by constructing their own answers, mis-conceptions could be revealed and corrected in a timely manner.

References & Citations

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2. Caldwell JE 2007 Clickers in the large classroom: current research and best-practice tips CBE Life Sci Educ 6 9 20 10.1187/cbe.06-12-0205 17339389 1810212 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.06-12-0205
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8. Knight JK, Wise SB, Southard KM 2013 Understanding clicker discussions: student reasoning and the impact of instructional cues CBE Life Sci Educ 12 645 654 24297291 3846515
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10. Levesque AA 2011 Using clickers to facilitate development of problem-solving skills CBE Life Sci Educ 10 406 17 10.1187/cbe.11-03-0024 22135374 3228658 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.11-03-0024
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2015-05-01
2019-11-11

Abstract:

The use of class-response systems such as the Clickers to promote active-learning during lectures has been wide-spread. However, the often-used MCQ format in class activities as well as in assessments for large classes might lower students’ expectations and attitudes towards learning. Here, I describe my experience converting MCQs to constructed-response questions for in-class learning activities by removing cues from the MCQs. From the responses submitted, students seemed capable of providing answers without the need for cues. Using class-response systems such as Socrative for such constructed-response questions could be useful to challenge students to express their ideas in their own words. Moreover, by constructing their own answers, mis-conceptions could be revealed and corrected in a timely manner.

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