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Creating Stop-Motion Animations to Learn Molecular Biology Dynamics

    Authors: Celeste N. Peterson1,*, Pauline Ngo1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Suffolk University, Boston, MA 02114
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, Suffolk University, 41 Temple Street, Boston, MA 02114. Phone: 617-573-8249. Fax: 617-573-8668. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 280-281. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.922
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    Abstract:

    Classes in molecular biology have historically used static diagrams to capture how molecular processes occur in space and time. Here we describe using 3D claymation as an alternative. Students choose a molecular process, plan how to represent it with physical objects, and produce a stop motion video that then is shared with other students over the internet. This process can be easily implemented in undergraduate biology classes at all levels, and requires very little resources. The exercise offers the students a multisensory learning experience and the opportunity to contribute to open education resources.

References & Citations

1. Bogiages C, Hitt AM 2008 Movie mitosis: students make stop-animation films to illustrate the process of mitosis Sci Teach 75 36 43
2. Deaton CM, Deaton BE, Ivankovic D, Norris FA 2014 Creating stop-motion videos with iPads to support students’ understanding of cell processes J Digit Learn Teach Educ 30 67 73 10.1080/21532974.2013.10784729 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21532974.2013.10784729
3. Doyle T 2011 Learner centered teaching: putting the research on learning into practice Stylus Publishing Sterling, Virginia
4. Ernst MO, Bulthoff HH 2004 Merging the senses into a robust percept Trends Cogn Sci 8 162 169 10.1016/j.tics.2004.02.002 15050512 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2004.02.002
5. Johnson GT, Hertig S 2014 A guide to the visual analysis and communication of biomolecular structural data Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 15 690 698 10.1038/nrm3874 25245078 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrm3874
6. Kamp BL, Deaton CM 2013 Move, stop, learn: illustrating mitosis through stop-motion animation Sci Act 50 146 153
7. McClean P, et al 2005 Molecular and cellular biology animations: development and impact on student learning Cell Biol Educ 4 169 179 10.1187/cbe.04-07-0047 15917875 1103718 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.04-07-0047
8. Pashler H, Rohrer D, Cepeda NJ, Carpenter SK 2007 Enhancing learning and retarding forgetting: choices and consequences Psychon Bull Rev 14 187 193 10.3758/BF03194050 17694899 http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03194050
9. Tabor SW, Minch RP 2013 Student adoption & development of digital learning media: action research and recommended practices J Info Tech Ed Res 12 203 223

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.922
2015-12-01
2019-08-19

Abstract:

Classes in molecular biology have historically used static diagrams to capture how molecular processes occur in space and time. Here we describe using 3D claymation as an alternative. Students choose a molecular process, plan how to represent it with physical objects, and produce a stop motion video that then is shared with other students over the internet. This process can be easily implemented in undergraduate biology classes at all levels, and requires very little resources. The exercise offers the students a multisensory learning experience and the opportunity to contribute to open education resources.

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FIGURE 1

Example screenshots from claymation movie describing transcription in bacteria. (http://youtu.be/TM7SgZB1Nnk).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 280-281. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.922
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