1887

Moss in the Classroom: A Tiny but Mighty Tool for Teaching Biology

    Authors: Erin E. Shortlidge1,*, James R. Hashimoto2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85281; 2: da Vinci Arts Middle School, Portland, OR, 97233
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: 451 E Tyler Mall, Tempe AZ 85281. Phone: 480-965-0803. Fax: 480-965-6899. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 289-291. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.947
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    322.02 Kb
  • XML
  • HTML
    28.85 Kb

    Abstract:

    Here we present a mechanism to infuse ecology into the classroom using a broadly adaptable system. We developed a novel moss-based project that introduces research-based experiences for middle school students, and can be modified for integration into K-16 classrooms. The project is ecologically relevant, facilliating opportunities for students to experience intimate interactions with ecosystem subtleties by asking their own questions. We describe and suggest how students can develop, build, test, and assess microcosm experiments of their own design, learning the process of science by “doing science.” Details on project execution, representative examples of distinctive research-question-based projects are presented. We aim for biology educators to adopt, replicate, modify, and formally assess this relatively simple, low-cost moss-based project across classroom levels. The project provides a chance for students to experience the complexity of a dynamic ecosystem via a research project of their own design as they practice basic tenets of scientific discovery.Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the protocols included in this article follow a minimum of Biosafety Level 1 practices. Adopters who wish to culture microbes from the moss as an extension of this protocol should follow Biosafety Level 2 practices.

References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action: a summary of recommendations made at a national conference organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science July 15–17, 2009 Washington, DC
2. Bascom-Slack CA, Arnold AE, Strobel SA 2012 Student-directed discovery of the plant microbiome and its products Science 338 485 486 10.1126/science.1215227 23112324 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1215227
3. Bloom BS, Krathwohl DR 1956 Taxonomy of educational objectives: the classification of educational goals Handbook I: Cognitive domain D. McKay New York, NY
4. Britner SL, Pajares F 2006 Sources of science self-efficacy beliefs of middle school students J Res Sci Teach 43 485 499 10.1002/tea.20131 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.20131
5. Brownell SE, et al 2014 How students think about experimental design: novel conceptions revealed by in-class activities BioScience 64 125 137 10.1093/biosci/bit016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bit016
6. Crowe A, Dirks C, Wenderoth MP 2008 Biology in bloom: implementing Bloom’s taxonomy to enhance student learning in biology CBE Life Sci Educ 7 368 381 10.1187/cbe.08-05-0024 19047424 2592046 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.08-05-0024
7. Deane T, Nomme K, Jeffery E, Pollock C, Birol G 2014 Development of the Biological Experimental Design Concept Inventory (BEDCI) CBE Life Sci Educ 13 540 551 25185236 4152214
8. Eilam B 2012 System thinking and feeding relations: learning with a live ecosystem model Instructional Science 40 213 239 10.1007/s11251-011-9175-4 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11251-011-9175-4
9. Glime JM 2014 The fauna: a place to call home Ch 1 Glime JM Bryophyte Ecology, Volume 2, Bryological Interaction Ebook sponsored by Michigan Technological University and the International Association of Bryologists Last updated 29 April 2014 and available at <www.bryoecol.mtu.edu>
10. Hanauer DI, Dolan EL 2014 The project ownership survey: measuring differences in scientific inquiry experiences CBE Life Sci Educ 13 149 158 24591513 3940455
11. Hoskins SG, Stevens LM, Nehm RH 2007 Selective use of the primary literature transforms the classroom into a virtual laboratory Genetics 176 1381 1389 10.1534/genetics.107.071183 17483426 1931557 http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.107.071183
12. Lindo Z, Gonzalez A 2010 The bryosphere: an integral and influential component of the Earth’s biosphere Ecosystems 13 612 627 10.1007/s10021-010-9336-3 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10021-010-9336-3
13. Moore JC, Tripp BB, Simpson RT, Coleman DT 2000 Springtails in the classroom – Collembola as model organisms for inquiry-based laboratories Am Biol Teach 62 512 519

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.947
2015-12-01
2019-11-11

Abstract:

Here we present a mechanism to infuse ecology into the classroom using a broadly adaptable system. We developed a novel moss-based project that introduces research-based experiences for middle school students, and can be modified for integration into K-16 classrooms. The project is ecologically relevant, facilliating opportunities for students to experience intimate interactions with ecosystem subtleties by asking their own questions. We describe and suggest how students can develop, build, test, and assess microcosm experiments of their own design, learning the process of science by “doing science.” Details on project execution, representative examples of distinctive research-question-based projects are presented. We aim for biology educators to adopt, replicate, modify, and formally assess this relatively simple, low-cost moss-based project across classroom levels. The project provides a chance for students to experience the complexity of a dynamic ecosystem via a research project of their own design as they practice basic tenets of scientific discovery.Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the protocols included in this article follow a minimum of Biosafety Level 1 practices. Adopters who wish to culture microbes from the moss as an extension of this protocol should follow Biosafety Level 2 practices.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/16/2/jmbe-16-289.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.947&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Mosscosms in action: a) mosscosms, b) student collecting data on mosscosms c) subsampling grid technique for counting springtails, d) students observe springtails collected from funnel extractions, e) graphing springtail population growth data, f) student poster:

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 289-291. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.947
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error