1887

Student Misconceptions about Plants – A First Step in Building a Teaching Resource

    Authors: April N. Wynn1,‡, Irvin L. Pan2, Elizabeth E. Rueschhoff3, Maryann A. B. Herman4, E. Kathleen Archer5,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Biological Sciences Department, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA 22401; 2: Biology Department, Stonehill College, Easton, MA 02357; 3: Biology Program, School of Natural Sciences, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN 47150; 4: Biology Department, St. John Fisher College, Rochester, NY 14618; 5: Biology Department, Trinity College, Hartford, CT 06106
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 14 October 2016 Accepted 22 January 2017 Published 21 April 2017
    • ©2017 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: E. Kathleen Archer. 300 Summit Street, Biology Department, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, 06106. Phone: 860-297-2226. E-mail: [email protected].
    • All authors contributed equally.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1253
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    Abstract:

    Plants are ubiquitous and found in virtually every ecosystem on Earth, but their biology is often poorly understood, and inaccurate ideas about how plants grow and function abound. Many articles have been published documenting student misconceptions about photosynthesis and respiration, but there are substantially fewer on such topics as plant cell structure and growth; plant genetics, evolution, and classification; plant physiology (beyond energy relations); and plant ecology. The available studies of misconceptions held on those topics show that many are formed at a very young age and persist throughout all educational levels. Our goal is to begin building a central resource of plant biology misconceptions that addresses these underrepresented topics, and here we provide a table of published misconceptions organized by topic. For greater utility, we report the age group(s) in which the misconceptions were found and then map them to the ASPB – BSA Core Concepts and Learning Objectives in Plant Biology for Undergraduates, developed jointly by the American Society of Plant Biologists and the Botanical Society of America.

Key Concept Ranking

Plant Structures
0.48746958
Signal Transduction
0.41602454
0.48746958

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2017-04-21
2019-10-23

Abstract:

Plants are ubiquitous and found in virtually every ecosystem on Earth, but their biology is often poorly understood, and inaccurate ideas about how plants grow and function abound. Many articles have been published documenting student misconceptions about photosynthesis and respiration, but there are substantially fewer on such topics as plant cell structure and growth; plant genetics, evolution, and classification; plant physiology (beyond energy relations); and plant ecology. The available studies of misconceptions held on those topics show that many are formed at a very young age and persist throughout all educational levels. Our goal is to begin building a central resource of plant biology misconceptions that addresses these underrepresented topics, and here we provide a table of published misconceptions organized by topic. For greater utility, we report the age group(s) in which the misconceptions were found and then map them to the ASPB – BSA Core Concepts and Learning Objectives in Plant Biology for Undergraduates, developed jointly by the American Society of Plant Biologists and the Botanical Society of America.

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