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Student Use of Self-Data for Out-of-Class Graphing Activities Increases Student Engagement and Learning Outcomes

    Author: Cynthia A. DeBoy1
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    Affiliations: 1: Trinity Washington University, Washington, DC 20017
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 05 April 2017 Accepted 06 September 2017 Published 01 December 2017
    • ©2017 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Trinity Washington University, 125 Michigan Ave, NE, Washington, DC 20017. Phone: 202-884-9257. Fax: 202-884-9229. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
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    Abstract:

    Two out-of-class graphing activities related to hormonal regulation of the reproductive cycle and stress responses are used to determine whether student use of self-data vs. provided data increases engagement, learning outcomes, and attitude changes. Comparisons of quizzes and surveys for students using self- vs. provided data suggest that while both activities increase learning outcomes, use of self-data compared with provided data has a greater impact on increasing learning outcomes, promotes recognition that hormones are relevant, and enhances confidence in graphing skills and graphing efficacy.

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References & Citations

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4. Brownell SE, Hekmat-Scafe DS, Singla V, Chandler Seawell P, Conklin Imam JF, Eddy SL, Stearns T, Cyert MS 2015 A high-enrollment course-based undergraduate research experience improves student conceptions of scientific thinking and ability to interpret data CBE Life Sci Educ 14 14 ar21 10.1187/cbe.14-05-0092 26033869 4477737 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.14-05-0092
5. Rodenbusch SE, Hernandez PR, Simmons SL, Dolan EL 2016 Early engagement in course-based research increases graduation rates and completion of science, engineering, and mathematics degrees CBE Life Sci Educ 15 2 Ar 20 10.1187/cbe.16-03-0117 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.16-03-0117
6. Gasper BJ, Gardner SM 2013 Engaging students in authentic microbiology research in an introductory biology laboratory course is correlated with gains in student understanding of the nature of authentic research and critical thinking J Microbiol Biol Educ 14 25 34 10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.460 23858351 3706163 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.460
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2017-12-01
2019-08-19

Abstract:

Two out-of-class graphing activities related to hormonal regulation of the reproductive cycle and stress responses are used to determine whether student use of self-data vs. provided data increases engagement, learning outcomes, and attitude changes. Comparisons of quizzes and surveys for students using self- vs. provided data suggest that while both activities increase learning outcomes, use of self-data compared with provided data has a greater impact on increasing learning outcomes, promotes recognition that hormones are relevant, and enhances confidence in graphing skills and graphing efficacy.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

A) Average percentage from 14, 14, and 15 students answering 4, 9, or 3 questions correctly on the quiz after the lecture, after using self-data for the BBT activity, and on the final quiz, respectively (* < 0.05 compared with quizzes after the BBT activity and on the final. Error bars represent standard deviation.) B) Percentage of students correctly answering questions asked on both a quiz before the BBT activity and on the final were compared between a class in which everyone used self-data for the activity and students from a class using all provided data (12 students in the provided group, and 14 for the initial quiz and 15 for the final quiz in the self-group). BBT = basal body temperature.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Average percentage of correct responses on pre-activity quiz and final exam. A) From a class with 6 students in each group. There were 11 and 12 questions related to the BBT (reproductive) activity on the pre quiz (before the activity) and final, respectively, and 4 and 3 questions related to stress on the pre quiz and final, respectively (* < 0.05). B) From a class with 7 students in the group using self-data for the BBT activity (provided for the stress activity) and 5 students in the other group, with BBT quizzes consisting of 5 questions on the pre quiz and 8 questions on the final, and the stress quizzes consisting of 3 questions for each. Error bars represent standard error of the mean. BBT = basal body temperature.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
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Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Percentage of students correctly answering a hormone regulation question before and after completing BBT or stress graphing activities when using self- or provided data. BBT = basal body temperature.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
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Image of FIGURE 4

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FIGURE 4

Grade comparison between classes using self-data ( = 15 in each) and a class using provided data ( = 13). > 0.05 for percentages on initial quizzes.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
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Image of FIGURE 5

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FIGURE 5

Percentage of survey responses from students using A) provided data from the BBT activity, B) self-data from the BBT activity, C) provided data from the stress activity, and D) self-data from the stress activity. BBT = basal body temperature.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
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Image of FIGURE 6

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FIGURE 6

Likert survey results comparing average responses from students in a class using only provided data (9 students) with responses from students in classes using self-data (28 students) for one graphing activity. (Strongly agree = 5, Agree = 4, Neutral = 3, Disagree = 2, Strongly disagree = 1)

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1327
Download as Powerpoint

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