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“Everyone Was Nice…But I Was Still Left Out”: An Interview Study About Deaf Interns’ Research Experiences in STEM

    Authors: Megan Majocha1, Zachary Davenport1, Derek C. Braun1, Cara Gormally1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC 20002
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 30 June 2017 Accepted 28 December 2017 Published 27 April 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics, E333 Hall Memorial Building, 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Phone: 202-651-5385. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1381
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    Abstract:

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate research experiences improve success, persistence, and promote a feeling of belonging to a community. Like their hearing peers, deaf STEM majors often participate in undergraduate research experiences. However, deaf students typically interact with hearing faculty lacking experience with deaf students and awareness of Deaf culture, which unintentionally impacts their research experiences. This interview study sought to understand deaf students’ research experiences and their relationships with hearing mentors. Findings indicate that lack of awareness of Deaf culture and lack of communication access impact students’ experiences. We make recommendations on improving deaf students’ research experiences.

References & Citations

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3. Nagda BA, Gregerman SR, Jonides J, Hippel von W, Lerner JS 1998 Undergraduate student-faculty research partnerships affect student retention Rev High Educ 22 55 72 10.1353/rhe.1998.0016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/rhe.1998.0016
4. Woodcock K, Rohan MJ, Campbell L 2007 Equitable representation of deaf people in mainstream academia: why not? Higher Educ 53 359 379 10.1007/s10734-005-2428-x http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10734-005-2428-x
5. Braun DC, Gormally C, Clark MD 2017 The deaf mentoring survey: a community cultural wealth framework for measuring mentoring effectiveness with underrepresented students CBE Life Sci Educ 16 ar10 10.1187/cbe.15-07-0155 28188283 5332036 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.15-07-0155
6. Haeger H, Fresquez C 2016 Mentoring for inclusion: the impact of mentoring on undergraduate researchers in the sciences CBE Life Sci Educ 15 ar36 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0016 27543635 5008883 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.16-01-0016
7. Listman JD, Dingus-Eason J 2016 How to be a deaf scientist: building navigational capital J Diversity Higher Educ 1 17
8. Hong L, Page SE 2004 Groups of diverse problem solvers can outperform groups of high-ability problem solvers Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101 16385 16389 10.1073/pnas.0403723101 15534225 528939 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0403723101
9. Campbell LG, Mehtani S, Dozier ME, Rinehart J 2013 Gender-heterogeneous working groups produce higher quality science PLOS One 8 e79147 6 10.1371/journal.pone.0079147 3813606 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0079147
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11. Carmeli DB 2004 Prevalence of Jews as subjects in genetic research: figures, explanation, and potential implications Am J Med Genet 130A 76 83 10.1002/ajmg.a.20291 15368499 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.20291
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16. Bauman HDL, Murray JJ 2014 Deaf gain: raising the stakes for human diversity University of Minnesota Press Minneapolis, MN
17. Holcomb TK 2010 Deaf epistemology: the deaf way of knowing Am Ann Deaf 154 471 478 10.1353/aad.0.0116 20415282 http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.0.0116
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19. Ladd P 2003 Understanding deaf culture: in search of deafhood Multilingual Matters Ltd Buffalo, NY

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2018-04-27
2019-08-25

Abstract:

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate research experiences improve success, persistence, and promote a feeling of belonging to a community. Like their hearing peers, deaf STEM majors often participate in undergraduate research experiences. However, deaf students typically interact with hearing faculty lacking experience with deaf students and awareness of Deaf culture, which unintentionally impacts their research experiences. This interview study sought to understand deaf students’ research experiences and their relationships with hearing mentors. Findings indicate that lack of awareness of Deaf culture and lack of communication access impact students’ experiences. We make recommendations on improving deaf students’ research experiences.

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FIGURE 1

Major themes from the interviews (shown in circles) and recommendations for improving deaf interns’ STEM research internship experiences (bullet points).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1381
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