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QR Code Lecture Activity as a Tool for Increasing Nonmajors Biology Students’ Enjoyment of Interaction with Their Local Environment

    Authors: Margaret Smith1,*, Miriam Segura-Totten1, Kelly West1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA 30597
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 22 August 2017 Accepted 29 January 2018 Published 27 April 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, University of North Georgia, 32 Sunset Drive, Dahlonega, GA 30597. Phone: 706-864-5822. Fax: 706-867-2703. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1453
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    Abstract:

    The impact of the Internet on education has been recognized for decades, and as technology advances, the ways in which students can access Internet content is ever increasing. Most students have some kind of portable smart device with which they access Internet content without the locational constraints of a desktop computer. This mobility has prompted abundant literature suggesting ways that Quick Response Codes (QR codes), a kind of two dimensional barcode, could be used to advance student learning. However, very few studies have tested the usefulness of QR codes in undergraduate science classes. We report on our development of a campus “scavenger hunt” activity using QR codes. We found that this activity develops application skills of the concepts of native and invasive species and enjoyment of coverage of content relative to traditional lecture in a nonmajors Environmental Science class at a four-year teaching institution.

References & Citations

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3. Frisch JK, Jackson PC, Murray MC 2013 Research and teaching: WikiED: using Web 2.0 Tools to teach content and critical thinking J Coll Sci Teach 443 70 80
4. Levin-Goldberg J 2014 Webquests 2.0. Best practices for the 21 st century J Instruct Res 3 73 82
5. Robertson C, Green T 2012 Scanning the potential for using QR codes in the classroom TechTrends 56 11 12 10.1007/s11528-012-0558-4 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11528-012-0558-4
6. Gradel K, Edson AJ 2012 QR codes in higher ed: fad or functional tool? J Educ Technol Syst 41 45 67 10.2190/ET.41.1.e http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/ET.41.1.e
7. Lee JK, Lee IS, Kwon YJ 2011 Scan & learn! Use of quick response codes & smartphones in a biology field study Am Biol Teach 73 485 492 10.1525/abt.2011.73.8.11 http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/abt.2011.73.8.11
8. Yip T, Melling L, Shaw KJ 2016 Evaluation of an online instructional database accessed by QR codes to support biochemistrypractical laboratory courses J Chem Educ 93 1556 1560 10.1021/acs.jchemed.6b00184 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jchemed.6b00184
9. Bloom BS, Engelhart MD, Furst EJ, Hill WH 1956 Taxonomy of educational objectives; the classification of educational goals Handbook I: cognitive domain Longmans Green, New York, NY
10. Crowe A, Dirks C, Wenderoth MP 2008 Biology in bloom: implementing Bloom’s taxonomy to enhance student learning in biology CBE Life Sci Educ 7 368 381 10.1187/cbe.08-05-0024 19047424 2592046 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.08-05-0024
11. Wolf LF, Smith JK 1995 The consequence of consequence: motivation, anxiety, and test performance Appl Measure Educ 8 227 242 10.1207/s15324818ame0803_3 http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15324818ame0803_3
12. Wise SL, DeMars CE 2005 Low examinee effort in low-stakes assessment: problems and potential solutions Educ Assess 10 1 17 10.1207/s15326977ea1001_1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15326977ea1001_1
13. Cole JS, Osterlind SJ 2008 Investigating differences between low- and high-stakes test performance on a general education exam J Gen Educ 57 119 130 10.1353/jge.0.0018 http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jge.0.0018

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2018-04-27
2019-08-25

Abstract:

The impact of the Internet on education has been recognized for decades, and as technology advances, the ways in which students can access Internet content is ever increasing. Most students have some kind of portable smart device with which they access Internet content without the locational constraints of a desktop computer. This mobility has prompted abundant literature suggesting ways that Quick Response Codes (QR codes), a kind of two dimensional barcode, could be used to advance student learning. However, very few studies have tested the usefulness of QR codes in undergraduate science classes. We report on our development of a campus “scavenger hunt” activity using QR codes. We found that this activity develops application skills of the concepts of native and invasive species and enjoyment of coverage of content relative to traditional lecture in a nonmajors Environmental Science class at a four-year teaching institution.

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FIGURE 1

An example of a QR (quick response) code.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1453
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