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Understanding Student Perceptions and Practices for Pre-Lecture Content Reading in the Genetics Classroom

    Authors: William J. Gammerdinger1,*, Thomas D. Kocher1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. July 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1371
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    Abstract:

    Many faculty members assign textbook readings prior to their traditional lectures. In this study, we assessed students’ level of class preparedness and surveyed their textbook reading practices weekly along with entrance and exit surveys concerning their attitudes toward reading the textbook. We report that pre-lecture reading is a significant variable in explaining pre-lecture preparedness as well as exam scores. We also report the reasons participants cited for not reading more of the textbook. We hope this analysis will allow educators to have a better understanding of the level of pre-lecture reading that is occurring in a traditional lecture-style course and the impacts of pre-lecture reading on student success.

References & Citations

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10. Britton LA, Wandersee JH 1997 Cutting up text to make moveable, magnetic diagrams: a way of teaching & assessing biological processes Am Biol Teach 59 288 291 10.2307/4450310 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4450310
11. Van Meter P, Garner J 2005 The promise and practice of learner-generated drawing: literature review and synthesis Educ Psychol Rev 17 285 325 10.1007/s10648-005-8136-3 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10648-005-8136-3
12. Ainsworth S, Prain V, Tytler R Drawing to learn in science Science 333 1096 1097 2011 10.1126/science.1204153 21868658 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1204153
13. Newnham R, Mather A, Grattan J, Holmes A, Gardner A 1998 An evaluation of the use of internet sources as a basis for geography coursework J Geogr High Educ 22 19 34 10.1080/03098269885994 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03098269885994
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15. Theobald R, Freeman S 2014 Is it the intervention or the students? Using linear regression to control for student characteristics in undergraduate STEM education research CBE Life Sci Educ 13 41 48 10.1187/cbe-13-07-0136 24591502 3940461 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe-13-07-0136

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1371
2018-07-31
2019-08-24

Abstract:

Many faculty members assign textbook readings prior to their traditional lectures. In this study, we assessed students’ level of class preparedness and surveyed their textbook reading practices weekly along with entrance and exit surveys concerning their attitudes toward reading the textbook. We report that pre-lecture reading is a significant variable in explaining pre-lecture preparedness as well as exam scores. We also report the reasons participants cited for not reading more of the textbook. We hope this analysis will allow educators to have a better understanding of the level of pre-lecture reading that is occurring in a traditional lecture-style course and the impacts of pre-lecture reading on student success.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Self-reported reading levels for each week of the study. Color bars indicate whether students read “All,” “Some,” or “None of the assigned reading before lecture.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. July 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1371
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

The level of pre-lecture preparedness of students for each week of the study as assessed by pre-lecture assessments. Colored lines represent the average pre-lecture assessment score for students according to whether they reported reading “All,” “Some,” or “None” of the assigned reading before lecture. Counts for each group, corresponding to Figure 1 , are also provided.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. July 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1371
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