1887

Student-Designed High-Throughput Assays to Assess Effects of Growth Insults in Budding Yeast

    Authors: Veronica A. Segarra1,*, Carrie Wilson1, Kelley Lowery1, Slade Ransdell1, Jamie Schnuck2, Paul Way2, Melissa C. Srougi2,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268; 2: Department of Chemistry, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 29 November 2017 Accepted 23 April 2018 Published 29 June 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding authors. Veronica A. Segarra. Mailing address: High Point University, 237 B Couch Hall, One University Parkway, High Point, NC 27268. Phone: 336-841-9507. Fax: 336-888-6341. E-mail: [email protected]. Melissa C. Srougi. Mailing address: High Point University, 355 D Couch Hall, One University Parkway, High Point, NC 27268. Phone: 336-841-9619. Fax: 336-888-6341. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. June 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1542
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • HTML
    25.63 Kb
  • PDF
    272.05 Kb
  • XML
    24.40 Kb

    Abstract:

    Modern high-throughput screening is a versatile method used widely in academic and industrial labs for genetic and pharmacological testing, but is underutilized in undergraduate laboratories. We designed an open inquiry-based laboratory activity exploiting a small-scale high-throughput screening assay of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae to promote active learning and introduce students to modern data collection and analysis techniques. In this activity, students at both the high school and university levels generate growth curves of S. cerevisiae using a microplate reader after treatment with their insult of choice. This lab presents an ideal opportunity for both high school and university students to actively learn about the process of science as well as high-throughput data collection and analysis in a cost-effective manner.

References & Citations

1. Macarron R, Banks MN, Bojanic D, Burns DJ, Cirovic DA, Garyantes T, Green DV, Hertzberg RP, Janzen WP, Paslay JW, Schopfer U, Sittampalam GS 2011 Impact of high-throughput screening in biomedical research Nat Rev Drug Discov 10 188 195 10.1038/nrd3368 21358738 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrd3368
2. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action: a summary of recommendations made at a national conference organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science July 15–17, 2009 Washington, DC Available from: http://visionandchange.org/finalreport/
3. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2015 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: chronicling change, inspiring the future Available from: http://visionandchange.org/chronicling-change/
4. Srougi MC, Thomas-Swanik J, Chan JD, Marchant JS, Carson S 2014 Making heads or tails: planarian stem cells in the classroom J Microbiol Biol Educ 15 18 25 10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.692 24839511 4004734 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.692
5. Bowey-Dellinger K, Dixon L, Ackerman K, Vigueira C, Suh YK, Lyda T, Sapp K, Grider M, Crater D, Russell T, Elias M, Coffield VM, Segarra VA 2017 Introducing mammalian cell culture and cell viability techniques in the undergraduate biology laboratory J Microbiol Biol Educ 18 2 10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1264 28861134 5576768 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1264
6. Wilson KJ, Rigakos B Scientific process flowchart assessment (SPFA): a method for evaluating changes in understanding and visualization of the scientific process in a multidisciplinary student population CBE Life Sci Educ 15 4 pii:ar63 27856551 5132360
7. Kwolek-Mirek M, Zadrag-Tecza R 2014 Comparison of methods used for assessing the viability and vitality of yeast cells FEMS Yeast Res 14 1068 1079 25154541
8. Bruck L, Bretz SL, Towns ML 2008 Characterizing the level of inquiry in the undergraduate laboratory J Coll Sci Teach 38 52 88
9. Freeman S, Eddy SL, McDonough M, Smith MK, Okoroafor N, Jordt H, Wenderoth MP 2014 Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 111 8410 8415 10.1073/pnas.1319030111 24821756 4060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
10. Guthrie C 2002 Guide to yeast genetics and molecular and cell biology, part C Methods in Enzymology 351 Academic Press New York

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1542
2018-06-29
2019-08-18

Abstract:

Modern high-throughput screening is a versatile method used widely in academic and industrial labs for genetic and pharmacological testing, but is underutilized in undergraduate laboratories. We designed an open inquiry-based laboratory activity exploiting a small-scale high-throughput screening assay of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae to promote active learning and introduce students to modern data collection and analysis techniques. In this activity, students at both the high school and university levels generate growth curves of S. cerevisiae using a microplate reader after treatment with their insult of choice. This lab presents an ideal opportunity for both high school and university students to actively learn about the process of science as well as high-throughput data collection and analysis in a cost-effective manner.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/19/2/jmbe-19-75.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1542&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Various insults decrease yeast growth. (A) Growth curves of treated for various times with microwave radiation. (B) Representative growth curves of wild-type and the mutant UV-sensitive strain treated with or without sunlight for various times. (C) Growth curves of treated for various times with 0.05 μg/mL, 0.1 μg/mL or 0.2 μg/mL of rapamycin. Results are representative of university students’ data. Averages ± STD of experiments performed in triplicate are shown

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. June 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1542
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error