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Exploring Infectious Disease Outbreaks and Herd Immunity Through Simulations with a Visual Appeal

    Author: Johanna M. Schwingel1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, NY 14778
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 01 January 2018 Accepted 27 June 2018 Published 31 August 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, St. Bonaventure University, 3261 West State Road, St. Bonaventure, NY 14778. Phone: 716-375-2639. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1570
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    Abstract:

    A quick review of social media indicates many people do not understand the importance of herd immunity and routine vaccinations toward curbing the spread of preventable infectious disease. This simulation is carried out in two consecutive phases. The first phase illustrates disease progression using acid-base chemistry and a pH indicator to identify participants who are infected during a simulated infectious disease outbreak. The second phase demonstrates the effectiveness of immunizations and resulting herd immunity during the same simulated infectious disease outbreak. A buffer is employed to serve as immune contacts not susceptible to infection. The pH indicators’ bright color (indicating an infection) is a welcomed visual for students and increases engagement while they anticipate whether their tube will turn pink or not.

References & Citations

1. Barber NC, Stark LA 2015 Online resources for understanding outbreaks and infectious diseases CBE Life Sci Educ 14 fe1 10.1187/cbe.14-12-0221 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.14-12-0221
2. Wiles J 2015 A simulation of communicable disease and herd immunity for the microbiology classroom or laboratory J Microbiol Biol Educ 16 278 279 10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.919 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.919
3. Williams AH 2011 A sweet vaccination—the deadly Hershey’s Kiss J Microbiol Biol Educ 12 54 55 10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.256 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.256

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2018-08-31
2019-11-22

Abstract:

A quick review of social media indicates many people do not understand the importance of herd immunity and routine vaccinations toward curbing the spread of preventable infectious disease. This simulation is carried out in two consecutive phases. The first phase illustrates disease progression using acid-base chemistry and a pH indicator to identify participants who are infected during a simulated infectious disease outbreak. The second phase demonstrates the effectiveness of immunizations and resulting herd immunity during the same simulated infectious disease outbreak. A buffer is employed to serve as immune contacts not susceptible to infection. The pH indicators’ bright color (indicating an infection) is a welcomed visual for students and increases engagement while they anticipate whether their tube will turn pink or not.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Example simulation table to record student data.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1570
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