1887

The Use of Baker’s Yeast in the Resazurin Reduction Test: A Simple, Low-Cost Method for Determining Cell Viability in Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays

    Author: Jayzon G. Bitacura1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, Visayas State University, Visca, Baybay City, Leyte 6521-A, Philippines
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 25 February 2018 Accepted 27 June 2018 Published 31 August 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences, Visayas State University, Visca, Baybay City, Leyte 6521-A, Philippines. Phone: +639176075221. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1599
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    Abstract:

    Cell viability assays require expensive commercial testing kits and sophisticated cell culture techniques. Thus, a laboratory activity for testing the cellular proliferative and cytotoxic effects of certain substances using baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in resazurin reduction test (RRT) was developed. This activity is based on the fact that a laboratory-prepared resazurin has identical effects to a resazurin-based commercial kits and that S. cerevisiae is an established model system for eukaryotic organisms. Here, a complete procedure based on optimized conditions was described in detail, from preparation of test materials and solutions up to the gathering and analysis of data. This laboratory activity provides a simple and cheap alternative to conventional cell viability assays and is therefore recommended for use in institutions with limited budget for the acquisition of materials for instruction purposes.

References & Citations

1. Candeias LP, MacFarlane DPS, McWhinnie SLW, Maidwell NL, Roesechlaub CA, Sammes PG, Whittlesey R 1998 The catalyzed NADH reduction of resazurin to resorufin J Chem Soc Perkin Trans 2 2333 2334 10.1039/a806431h http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/a806431h
2. Borra RC, Lotufo MA, Gagioti SM, Barros FDM, Andrade PM 2009 A simple method to measure cell viability in proliferation and cytotoxicity assays Braz Oral Res 23 3 255 262 10.1590/S1806-83242009000300006 19893959 http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1806-83242009000300006
3. Botstein D, Chervitz SA, Cherry JM 1997 Yeast as a model organism Science 277 5330 1259 1260 10.1126/science.277.5330.1259 9297238 3039837 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.277.5330.1259
4. Botstein D, Fink GR 2011 Yeast: an experimental organism for 21 st century biology Genetics 189 695 704 10.1534/genetics.111.130765 22084421 3213361 http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.111.130765
5. Matuo R, Sousa FG, Soares DG, Bonatto D, Saffi J, Escargueil AE, Larsen AK, Henriques JA 2012 Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to study the response to anticancer agents Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 70 491 502 10.1007/s00280-012-1937-4 22851206 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00280-012-1937-4
6. Ulukaya E, Acilan C, Ari F, Ikitimur E, Yilmaz Y 2011 A Glance at the methods for detection of apoptosis qualitatively and quantitatively Türk Biyokimya Dergisi Turk J Biochem 36 3 261 269

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1599
2018-08-31
2019-10-22

Abstract:

Cell viability assays require expensive commercial testing kits and sophisticated cell culture techniques. Thus, a laboratory activity for testing the cellular proliferative and cytotoxic effects of certain substances using baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in resazurin reduction test (RRT) was developed. This activity is based on the fact that a laboratory-prepared resazurin has identical effects to a resazurin-based commercial kits and that S. cerevisiae is an established model system for eukaryotic organisms. Here, a complete procedure based on optimized conditions was described in detail, from preparation of test materials and solutions up to the gathering and analysis of data. This laboratory activity provides a simple and cheap alternative to conventional cell viability assays and is therefore recommended for use in institutions with limited budget for the acquisition of materials for instruction purposes.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Sample results of RRT in S. cerevisiae treated with 0.1 M CdCl2 (a), sterile distilled water (b), tropical weed ethanolic extract concentrations of 100 ppm (c), 250 ppm (d), and 500 ppm (e), and 1% glucose solution (f).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1599
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