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The Use of a Fast-Paced, Competitive Drawing Game as a Student-Approved Review Strategy for Microbiology

    Author: Kara Mosovsky1
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    Affiliations: 1: Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA 18018
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1691
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    Abstract:

    This competitive drawing game, much like the “All Play” round of the popular board game Pictionary™, is a fast-paced, energy-rich review game, proven to keep students entertained, engaged, and learning. One representative from each of two competing teams simultaneously draw the same secret microbiology term, while their teammates frantically guess. The first team to correctly guess the word or phrase, wins a point. Unlike traditional Pictionary rules where only one team draws at a time, pitting teams against each other seems to increase the energy and engagement of student drawers and guessers, and allows every student to participate in each round of the game. Drawing microbiology terms not only helps strengthen associations between form and function, a crucial theme in microbiology, but also forces students to think differently and creatively about how to convey scientific terms through pictures. In addition, the game encourages simple recall of terms and definitions from past chapters. After one team has correctly guessed the secret term, all students participate in answering rapid-fire review questions related to the term. The result is a fun and stimulating review session of microbiology. In an anonymous survey administered after the game, about 94% of students found the activity to be an “effective” or “very effective” strategy to review previously covered material from the course. Out of those who participated in the survey, 100% rated the drawing game as a fun classroom activity, and 98% would recommend it for future semesters.

References & Citations

1. Wammes JD, Meade ME, Fernandes MA 2016 The drawing effect: evidence for reliable and robust memory benefits in free recall Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 69 1752 1776 10.1080/17470218.2015.1094494 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2015.1094494
2. Fiorella L, Mayer RE 2015 Eight ways to promote generative learning Educ Psychol Rev 28 717 741 10.1007/s10648-015-9348-9 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10648-015-9348-9
3. Lin L, Lee CH, Kalyuga S, Wang Y, Guan S, Wu H 2016 The effect of learner-generated drawing and imagination in comprehending a science text J Exp Educ 85 142 154 10.1080/00220973.2016.1143796 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00220973.2016.1143796
4. Leopold C, Leutner D 2012 Science text comprehension: drawing, main idea selection, and summarizing as learning strategies Learn Instr 22 16 26 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2011.05.005 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2011.05.005
5. Schmeck A, Mayer RE, Opfermann M, Pfeiffer V, Leutner D 2014 Drawing pictures during learning from scientific text: testing the generative drawing effect and the prognostic drawing effect Contemp Educ Psychol 39 275 286 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2014.07.003 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2014.07.003
6. Angel R, Everson G 1985 Pictionary Mattel
7. Peterson SN 2017 Using a modified version of Pictionary to help students review course material J Microbiol Biol Educ 18 3 18.3.63 10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1375 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1375
8. Rahman R, Yee B, Kee L 2016 The use of e-pictionary in vocabulary instruction Engl Teacher 3 2016 144 156
9. Gareau S, Guo R 2009 “All work and no play” reconsidered: the use of games to promote motivation and engagement in instruction Int J Scholarsh Teach Learn 3 12
10. Robinson FF 2014 It’s a game! Evaluation of a classroom game to enhance learning in an introductory counseling course Compr Psychol 10 https://doi.org/10.2466/07.08.IT.3.10

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1691
2018-12-14
2019-08-21

Abstract:

This competitive drawing game, much like the “All Play” round of the popular board game Pictionary™, is a fast-paced, energy-rich review game, proven to keep students entertained, engaged, and learning. One representative from each of two competing teams simultaneously draw the same secret microbiology term, while their teammates frantically guess. The first team to correctly guess the word or phrase, wins a point. Unlike traditional Pictionary rules where only one team draws at a time, pitting teams against each other seems to increase the energy and engagement of student drawers and guessers, and allows every student to participate in each round of the game. Drawing microbiology terms not only helps strengthen associations between form and function, a crucial theme in microbiology, but also forces students to think differently and creatively about how to convey scientific terms through pictures. In addition, the game encourages simple recall of terms and definitions from past chapters. After one team has correctly guessed the secret term, all students participate in answering rapid-fire review questions related to the term. The result is a fun and stimulating review session of microbiology. In an anonymous survey administered after the game, about 94% of students found the activity to be an “effective” or “very effective” strategy to review previously covered material from the course. Out of those who participated in the survey, 100% rated the drawing game as a fun classroom activity, and 98% would recommend it for future semesters.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Sample drawing of “selective media.”

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1691
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Student responses rating the effectiveness of the competitive drawing game as a strategy to review course content. Zero students selected “ineffective” or “very ineffective” from the options.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1691
Download as Powerpoint

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