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The Emory-Tibet Science Initiative: Rethinking Cross-Cultural Science and Teaching

    Authors: Kelsey Marie Gray1, Arri Eisen2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Emory-Tibet Science Initiative, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322; 2: Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 27 April 2018 Accepted 22 August 2018 Published 26 April 2019
    • ©2019 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Emory University, Department of Biology, O. Wayne Rollins Research Center, 1510 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322. Phone: 404-727-8724. Fax: 404-727-2880. E-mail address: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1618
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    Abstract:

    The Emory-Tibet Science Initiative was founded when the Dalai Lama invited Emory to develop and teach a comprehensive curriculum in modern science to Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns. The project was built to grow and nurture a two-way exchange between complementary systems of knowledge. In the 10 years since the first days of the pilot, the interactions between people and places and the scientific and learning processes have served as a platform for exploring teaching across cultures and enriching approaches to teaching and science more generally. As a result of these interactions, we expand our definition of inclusivity in the classroom and the practice of science, emphasize connections and tensions between science and other systems of knowledge, and create space for student and instructor reflection and learning. The next phase of the project will engage students in research projects as tools for learning and as a means to contribute knowledge to the project and the larger science education community.

References & Citations

1. Eisen A 2011 What Buddhist monks taught me about teaching science Chron High Educ Available at https://www.chronicle.com/article/What-Buddhist-Monks-Taught-Me/129697
2. Eisen A, Konchok Y 2018 The enlightened gene: biology, Buddhism, and the convergence that explains the world ForeEdge Lebanon, NH
3. Jinpa T 2010 Buddhism and science: how far can the dialogue proceed? Zygon 45 4 871 882 10.1111/j.1467-9744.2010.01138.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9744.2010.01138.x
4. Heuman L 2014 Under one umbrella: can tradition and science both fit? An interview with Thupten Jinpa Langri Tricycle 23 4 74 79 108 111
5. Hartfield-Méndez V 2013 Community-based learning, internationalization of the curriculum, and university engagement with Latino communities Hispania 96 2 355 368 10.1353/hpn.2013.0048 http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/hpn.2013.0048
6. Harris JC, Barone RP, Davis LP 2015 Who benefits?: A critical race analysis of the (d)evolving language of inclusion in higher education Thought Action 21 21 38
7. DiBartolo PM, Gregg-Jolly L, Gross D, Manduca CA, Iverson E, Cooke DB, Davis GK, Davidson C, Hertz PE, Hibbard L, Ireland SK, Mader C, Pai A, Raps S, Siwicki K, Swartz JE 2016 Principles and practices fostering inclusive excellence: lessons from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Capstone Institutions CBE Life Sci Educ 15 3 ar44 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0028 5008891 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.16-01-0028
8. Horowitz G, Domzalski A, Elizalde-Utnick G 2018 Can we teach science in a more culturally responsive way without sacrificing time or content? J Coll Sci Teach 47 6 8 10
9. Jackson MC, Galvez G, Landa I, Buonora P, Thoman DB 2016 Science that matters: the importance of a cultural connection in underrepresented students’ science pursuit CBE Life Sci Educ 15 3 ar42 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0067 27543631 5008889 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.16-01-0067
10. Balgopal MM, Wallace AM, Dahlberg S 2017 Writing from different cultural contexts: how college students frame an environmental SSI through written arguments J Res Sci Teach 54 2 195 218 10.1002/tea.21342 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.21342
11. Westmoreland D 2018 Supporting evolution by responding to “missing link” arguments Am Biol Teach 80 2 100 104 10.1525/abt.2018.80.2.100 http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.2.100
12. Lee TW, Grogan KE, Liepkalns JS 2017 Making evolution stick: using sticky notes to teach the mechanisms of evolutionary change Evol Educ Outreach 10 1 11 10.1186/s12052-017-0074-2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12052-017-0074-2
13. Lama Dalai 2005 The universe in a single atom: the convergence of science and spirituality Morgan Road Books New York
14. Russ RS, Scherr RE, Hammer D, Mikeska J 2008 Recognizing mechanistic reasoning in student scientific inquiry: a framework for discourse analysis developed from philosophy of science Sci Educ 92 3 499 525 10.1002/sce.20264 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sce.20264
15. Lemons P, Sensibaugh C, Halmo S, Jeong S, Idsardi R, Bhatia K “How do I solve real biochemical problems?” What analyzing students’ domain-specific problem solving reveals about their biochemical ideas, abstr 228 Annual Meeting 2018 July 27–29 Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research Minneapolis, MN
16. Bangera G, Brownell SE 2014 Course-based undergraduate research experiences can make scientific research more inclusive CBE Life Sci Educ 13 4 602 606 10.1187/cbe.14-06-0099 25452483 4255347 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.14-06-0099
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1618
2019-04-26
2019-10-15

Abstract:

The Emory-Tibet Science Initiative was founded when the Dalai Lama invited Emory to develop and teach a comprehensive curriculum in modern science to Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns. The project was built to grow and nurture a two-way exchange between complementary systems of knowledge. In the 10 years since the first days of the pilot, the interactions between people and places and the scientific and learning processes have served as a platform for exploring teaching across cultures and enriching approaches to teaching and science more generally. As a result of these interactions, we expand our definition of inclusivity in the classroom and the practice of science, emphasize connections and tensions between science and other systems of knowledge, and create space for student and instructor reflection and learning. The next phase of the project will engage students in research projects as tools for learning and as a means to contribute knowledge to the project and the larger science education community.

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Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1618
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Tibetan Buddhist monks at Sera Monastic University.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1618
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