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Yogurt Making as a Tool To Understand the Food Fermentation Process for Nonscience Participants

    Authors: Widya Agustinah1,*, Renna Eliana Warjoto2, Meda Canti1
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    Affiliations: 1: Program of Food Technology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jakarta 12930, Indonesia; 2: Program of Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jakarta 12930, Indonesia
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 26 July 2018 Accepted 14 November 2018 Published 26 April 2019
    • ©2019 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Program of Food Technology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jalan Jenderal Sudirman No. 51, Jakarta 12930, Indonesia. Phone: +62 21 5703306. Fax: +62 21 5719060. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1662
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    Abstract:

    Designing an outreach program concerning food fermentation for nonscience participants offers an opportunity to introduce the basic principles of microbiology and their application in food preservation. This program can be adapted to microbiology courses at the undergraduate level to help students understand the concept of food fermentation and its process control. Yogurt is a type of fermented milk that is commercially available in Indonesia. While yogurt fermentation is usually performed in a closed fermenter in an aseptically controlled room, yogurt can also be made at home using lactic acid bacteria culture starters, such as ssp. and , and applying proper hygiene and sanitation procedures. Yogurt making requires not only appropriate ingredients but also an understanding of the microbiological concepts of yogurt fermentation in order to enable control and modification of the fermentation process so that the end product is safe to consume. Through this activity, we provided training to residents from a nonscience background in Bogor, Indonesia, for simple and feasible homemade yogurt production using a variety of milk substrates and sources of starter culture. All participants prepared the ingredients and sanitized kitchen equipment, performed the yogurt fermentation process, and evaluated the product’s sensory properties. Participants were challenged to explore the differences among various yogurt batches. This activity can be completed in two days, and the recipe could be modified once the participants have understood the concept of yogurt fermentation.

References & Citations

1. Mazahreh AS, Ershidat OTM 2009 The benefits of lactic acid bacteria in yogurt on the gastrointestinal function and health Pakistan J Nutr 8 9 1404 1410 10.3923/pjn.2009.1404.1410 http://dx.doi.org/10.3923/pjn.2009.1404.1410
2. Hartati AI, Pramono YB, Legowo AM 2012 Lactose and reduction sugar concentrations, pH, and the sourness of date-flavored yogurt drink as probiotic beverage J Appl Food Technol 1 1 1 3
3. Legowo AM, Kusrahayu, Mulyani S 2009 Milk technology Diponegoro University Press Semarang, Indonesia
4. Yildiz F 2010 Development and manufacture of yogurt and other functional dairy products CRC Press Boca Raton, FL
5. Gad AS, Kholif AM, Sayed AF 2010 Evaluation of the nutritional value of functional yogurt resulting from combination of date palm syrup and skim milk Am J Food Technol 5 5 250 259 10.3923/ajft.2010.250.259 http://dx.doi.org/10.3923/ajft.2010.250.259
6. Apostolidis E, Kwon YI, Ghaedian R, Shetty K 2007 Fermentation of milk and soymilk by Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Lactobacillus acidophilus enhances functionality for potential dietary management of hyperglycemia and hypertension Food Biotechnol 21 217 236 10.1080/08905430701534032 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08905430701534032
7. Drake M, McKillip J 2000 Fermentation microbiology: making cheese, yogurt and buttermilk as a lab exercise Am Biol Teach 62 65 67 10.1662/0002-7685(2000)062[0065:FM]2.0.CO;2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1662/0002-7685(2000)062[0065:FM]2.0.CO;2
8. Holzapfel WH 2002 Appropriate starter culture technologies for small-scale fermentation in developing countries Int J Food Microbiol 75 197 212 10.1016/S0168-1605(01)00707-3 12036143 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-1605(01)00707-3
9. UCSF Institute for Health & Aging 2013 Green cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting: a toolkit for early care and education University of California San Francisco CA
10. Emmert EAB 2013 Biosafety guidelines for handling microorganisms in the teaching laboratory: development and rationale J Microbiol Biol Educ 14 78 83 10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.531 23858356 3706168 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.531

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2019-04-26
2019-10-21

Abstract:

Designing an outreach program concerning food fermentation for nonscience participants offers an opportunity to introduce the basic principles of microbiology and their application in food preservation. This program can be adapted to microbiology courses at the undergraduate level to help students understand the concept of food fermentation and its process control. Yogurt is a type of fermented milk that is commercially available in Indonesia. While yogurt fermentation is usually performed in a closed fermenter in an aseptically controlled room, yogurt can also be made at home using lactic acid bacteria culture starters, such as ssp. and , and applying proper hygiene and sanitation procedures. Yogurt making requires not only appropriate ingredients but also an understanding of the microbiological concepts of yogurt fermentation in order to enable control and modification of the fermentation process so that the end product is safe to consume. Through this activity, we provided training to residents from a nonscience background in Bogor, Indonesia, for simple and feasible homemade yogurt production using a variety of milk substrates and sources of starter culture. All participants prepared the ingredients and sanitized kitchen equipment, performed the yogurt fermentation process, and evaluated the product’s sensory properties. Participants were challenged to explore the differences among various yogurt batches. This activity can be completed in two days, and the recipe could be modified once the participants have understood the concept of yogurt fermentation.

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