1887

Modeling Pollen-Mediated Virus Spread in Bee Colonies as a Classroom Activity

    Authors: Veronica E. Snow1,*, Donna M. Becker1, Josh S. Sharp1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI 49855
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1684
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    Abstract:

    Using a hands-on approach, this activity introduces students to the concept of viral spread and honey bee pathogenesis by illustrating pathogen transmission throughout the hive. This viral transmission activity, designed for introductory biology, virology, or microbiology classes, can be used in laboratory or lecture settings. Students are provided with information on viral transmission and hive structure. Students then retrieve “pollen” and distribute it to the colony. A UV light passed across students’ hands determines which hive was infected, indicating the viral transmission pathways among bees. Students then discuss how viruses impact bees, how long it would take an infected hive to succumb to the pathogen, and what can be done to prevent viral spread.

References & Citations

1. Evans J, Schwarz R 2011 Bees brought to their knees: microbes affecting honey bee health Trends Microbiol 19 12 614 620 10.1016/j.tim.2011.09.003 22032828 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2011.09.003
2. Kulhanek K, Steinhauer N, Rennich K, Caron D, Sagili RR, Pettis JS, Ellis J, Wilson M, Wilkes J, Tarpy D, Rose R, Lee K, Rangel J, vanEngelsdorp D 2017 A national survey of managed honey bee 2015–2016 annual colony losses in the USA J Apicultural Res 56 4 328 340 10.1080/00218839.2017.1344496 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00218839.2017.1344496
3. O’Neal S, Swale D, Anderson T 2017 ATP-sensitive inwardly rectifying potassium channel regulation of viral infections in honey bees Sci Rep 7 8668 10.1038/s41598-017-09448-y 5561242 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09448-y
4. Shen M, Cui L, Ostiguy N, Cox-Foster D 2005 Intricate transmission routes and interactions between picorna-like viruses (Kashmir bee virus and Sacbrood virus) with the honeybee host and the parasitic Varroa mite J Gen Virol 86 2281 2289 10.1099/vir.0.80824-0 16033976 http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.80824-0
5. Singh R, Levitt AL, Rajotte EG, Holmes EC, Ostiguy N, vanEngelsdorp D, Lipkin WI, dePamphilis CW, Toth AL, Cox-Foster DL 2010 RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species PLOS One 5 12 e14357 10.1371/journal.pone.0014357 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0014357
6. Chen YP, Pettis JS, Collins A, Feldlaufer MF 2006 Prevalence and transmission of honeybee viruses Appl Environ Microbiol 72 1 606 611 10.1128/AEM.72.1.606-611.2006 16391097 1352288 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.72.1.606-611.2006
7. Mockel N, Gisder S, Genersch E 2011 Horizontal transmission of deformed wing virus: pathological consequences in adult bees (Apis mellifera) depend on the transmission route J Gen Virol 92 370 377 10.1099/vir.0.025940-0 http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.025940-0

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2019-04-26
2019-08-18

Abstract:

Using a hands-on approach, this activity introduces students to the concept of viral spread and honey bee pathogenesis by illustrating pathogen transmission throughout the hive. This viral transmission activity, designed for introductory biology, virology, or microbiology classes, can be used in laboratory or lecture settings. Students are provided with information on viral transmission and hive structure. Students then retrieve “pollen” and distribute it to the colony. A UV light passed across students’ hands determines which hive was infected, indicating the viral transmission pathways among bees. Students then discuss how viruses impact bees, how long it would take an infected hive to succumb to the pathogen, and what can be done to prevent viral spread.

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FIGURE 1

A) Non-contaminated glove. B) Non-contaminated “pollen” under UV light. C) “Pollen contaminated” with simulated virus. D) After exposure to simulated virus.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1684
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