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Teaching Microbiology by Celebrating Traditional Foods and Cultures from Morocco and Perú

    Author: Johana Meléndez1
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    Affiliations: 1: Hillsborough Community College, Tampa, Florida
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 22 August 2018 Accepted 19 September 2018 Published 26 April 2019
    • ©2019 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Hillsborough Community College, 1206 North Park Road, Plant City, FL 33563-1540. Phone: 813-757-2194. Fax: 813-259-6399. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1685
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    Abstract:

    According to a report published by the Center for Community College Student Engagement and others, global learning is considered one of the high-impact practices used to increase student engagement and motivation to learn. Engagement and motivation have also been linked to increased learning gains and improvement in the overall learning experience. Furthermore, global learning helps students explore other people’s cultures and worldviews, which is an important skill for students to gain in order to compete and adapt to solve the problems of our global society. Here, I discuss two class activities that faculty can adopt to implement global learning in their courses, with the purpose of engaging and motivating students to learn microbiology while celebrating some traditions from Morocco and Perú. Students researched traditional fermented foods and drinks from Perú and Morocco. Then, they answered guided questions to help them link the food items to microbiological concepts learned in class. For example: normal flora and fermentation were learned as students researched the process of making a Peruvian drink called “,” which is made from chewed corn that becomes fermented as it mixes with oral bacteria from saliva. While engaging in global learning, students learned some microbiology concepts; they passed the knowledge on to the campus community with poster presentations held during International Education Week. Based on students’ feedback and participation, I can conclude that teaching microbiology using global learning was engaging, promoted student learning, and motivated students to learn.

References & Citations

1. Center for Community College Student Engagement 2013 A matter of degrees: engaging practices, engaging students (high-impact practices for community college student engagement) The University of Texas at Austin Community College Leadership Program Austin, TX Available from: http://www.ccsse.org/docs/Matter_of_Degrees_2.pdf. Retrieved August 10, 2018
2. Kuh GD 2008 High-impact educational practices: what they are, who has access to them, and why they matter Association of American Colleges and Universities Washington, DC
3. Kuh GD, O’Donnell K 2013 Ensuring quality & taking high-impact practices to scale Association of American Colleges and Universities Washington, DC
4. Finley A, Brown McNair T 2013 Assessing underserved students’ engagement in high-impact practices American Association of Colleges and Universities Washington, DC Available from: www.aacu.org/assessinghips/documents/TGGrantReport_FINAL_11_13_13.pdf. Retrieved August 22, 2018
5. Association for American Colleges and Universities 2016 Global learning Available from: http://www.aacu.org/resources/globallearning/index.cfm. Retrieved August 22, 2018
6. Capozzi V, Spano G, Fiocco D 2012 Transdisciplinarity and microbiology education J Microbiol Biol Educ 13 1 70 73 10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.365 23653789 3577305 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.365
7. Benkerroum N 2013 Traditional fermented foods of North African Countries: technology and food safety challenge with regard to microbial risks Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 12 54 89 10.1111/j.1541-4337.2012.00215.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1541-4337.2012.00215.x
8. Freire AL, Zapata S, Mosquera J, Mejia ML, Trueba G 2016 Bacteria associated with human saliva are major microbial components of Ecuadorian indigenous beers (chicha) Peer J 4 e1962 10.7717/peerj.1962 27168974 4860339 http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1962
9. Adams N 2015 Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives J Med Libr Assoc 103 3 152 153 10.3163/1536-5050.103.3.010 26213509 4511057 http://dx.doi.org/10.3163/1536-5050.103.3.010
10. Green M 2012 Measuring and assessing internationalization NAFSA: Association of International Educators Washington, DC

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1685
2019-04-26
2019-09-18

Abstract:

According to a report published by the Center for Community College Student Engagement and others, global learning is considered one of the high-impact practices used to increase student engagement and motivation to learn. Engagement and motivation have also been linked to increased learning gains and improvement in the overall learning experience. Furthermore, global learning helps students explore other people’s cultures and worldviews, which is an important skill for students to gain in order to compete and adapt to solve the problems of our global society. Here, I discuss two class activities that faculty can adopt to implement global learning in their courses, with the purpose of engaging and motivating students to learn microbiology while celebrating some traditions from Morocco and Perú. Students researched traditional fermented foods and drinks from Perú and Morocco. Then, they answered guided questions to help them link the food items to microbiological concepts learned in class. For example: normal flora and fermentation were learned as students researched the process of making a Peruvian drink called “,” which is made from chewed corn that becomes fermented as it mixes with oral bacteria from saliva. While engaging in global learning, students learned some microbiology concepts; they passed the knowledge on to the campus community with poster presentations held during International Education Week. Based on students’ feedback and participation, I can conclude that teaching microbiology using global learning was engaging, promoted student learning, and motivated students to learn.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Students showcasing their projects during International Education Week, HCC, Plant City Campus, Morocco poster, Nov. 2, 2015 (Assignment #1).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1685
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Student projects showcased during International Education Week, HCC, Plant City Campus, Perú poster, Nov. 2, 2016 (Assignment #2).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2019 vol. 20 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i1.1685
Download as Powerpoint

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