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Histology Personal Trainer: Identifying Tissue Types Using Critical Thinking and Metacognition Prompts

    Authors: Sheela Vemu1,*, Holly Basta2, Deborah Catherine Cole3
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    Affiliations: 1: Waubonsee Community College, Sugar Grove, IL 60554; 2: Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT 59102; 3: Louis Stokes Midwest Regional Center for Excellence (LSMRCE), Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), STEM Education Innovation Research Institute (SEIRI), Indianapolis, IN 46202
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2019 vol. 20 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i2.1791
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    Abstract:

    Metacognitive reflections embedded in course activities allow students to evaluate their learning immediately following the activities themselves, while providing instructors the opportunity to revise and optimize instruction to target misconceptions. This activity, “Histology Personal Trainer” helps students not only identify major tissue types, but reflect on how they identified them. This activity aims to improve student performance by exercising the students’ observation and comparative skills in combination with a self-reflection activity that helps to identify successful and unsuccessful identification strategies. By the end of the activity, students should be able to adapt their approach to obtain more accurate answers. This activity was used in an anatomy and physiology course, but could be modified for use in various STEM classes.

References & Citations

1. Vedartham PB 2018 EdD thesis Investigating strategies to increase persistence and success rates among anatomy & physiology students: a case study at Austin community college district National American University Rapid City, SD, USA
2. Bransford JD, Brown AL, Cocking RR 2000 How people learn: brain, mind, experience, and school The National Academies Press Washington, DC
3. Tanner KD, Chatman LS, Allen D 2003 Approaches to cell biology teaching: cooperative learning in the science classroom—beyond students working in groups Cell Biol Educ 2 1 5 10.1187/cbe.03-03-0010 12822033 152788 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.03-03-0010
4. Tanner KD 2012 Promoting student metacognition CBE Life Sci Educ 11 2 113 120 10.1187/cbe.12-03-0033 22665584 3366894 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.12-03-0033
5. Stanton JD, Neider XN, Gallego IJ, Clark NC 2015 Differences in metacognitive regulation in introductory biology students: when prompts are not enough CBE Life Sci Educ 14 ar15 10.1187/cbe.14-08-0135 25976651 4477731 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.14-08-0135

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2019-08-30
2020-07-14

Abstract:

Metacognitive reflections embedded in course activities allow students to evaluate their learning immediately following the activities themselves, while providing instructors the opportunity to revise and optimize instruction to target misconceptions. This activity, “Histology Personal Trainer” helps students not only identify major tissue types, but reflect on how they identified them. This activity aims to improve student performance by exercising the students’ observation and comparative skills in combination with a self-reflection activity that helps to identify successful and unsuccessful identification strategies. By the end of the activity, students should be able to adapt their approach to obtain more accurate answers. This activity was used in an anatomy and physiology course, but could be modified for use in various STEM classes.

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FIGURE 1

Flowchart of activity.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2019 vol. 20 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i2.1791
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