1887

Collaborative Mentoring for Retaining Secondary Biology Teachers

    Authors: Kimberly A. Gonzalez1,*, David T. Eberiel2, Thomas B. Shea2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Science Division, Middlesex Community College, Bedford, MA 01730; 2: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2019 vol. 20 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i3.1811
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • XML
    53.59 Kb
  • PDF
    480.31 Kb
  • HTML
    52.47 Kb

    Abstract:

    Veteran biology teachers are at risk of leaving the classroom due to burnout, feeling uninspired, and overall job dissatisfaction. One way to keep veteran teachers engaged is through continued mentoring. Yet current mentoring programs vary in scope, often focus too heavily on one-to-one talk, with mentors serving as therapists, and generally fail to include veteran teachers. Considering this is not how schools operate, we argue active mentoring for veteran teachers is best when embedded into regular school practice. Collaborative mentoring, as we have termed it, pairs experienced high school teachers with other veteran colleagues, including university professors, in professional development activities centering on improving classroom practices. We believe that collaborative mentoring holds potential to meet the needs of all stakeholders—high school students for support in learning laboratory and writing skills; university faculty for hands-on classroom work and reflective practice, as well as for sharing content and pedagogical knowledge with professionals in the field; and, specifically, veteran biology teachers for expanding access to meaningful professional development opportunities. Focusing on applicable classroom pedagogy serves as a cost-effective model for professional development for veteran teachers, possibly increasing job satisfaction and teacher retention in high schools across the nation.

References & Citations

1. Hanson DT 1995 The call to teach Teachers College Press New York
2. Day C, Gu Q 2008 Veteran teachers: commitment, resilience and quality retention Teachers Teaching Theory Pract 15 441 457 10.1080/13540600903057211 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13540600903057211
3. Kini T, Podolsky A 2016 Does teaching experience increase teacher effectiveness? A review of the research Learning Policy Institute Palo Alto, CA Available from https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/sites/default/files/product-files/Teaching_Experience_Report_June_2016.pdf
4. Carrillo C, Flores MA 2017 Veteran teachers’ identity: what does the research literature tell us? Cambridge J Educ 48 639 656 doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2017.1394982
5. Penuel WR, Fishman BJ, Yamaguchi R, Gallagher LP 2007 What makes professional development effective? Strategies that foster curriculum implementation Am Educ Res J 44 921 958 10.3102/0002831207308221 http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0002831207308221
6. Bradley-Levine J, Mosier G, Lee JS 2016 Teacher mentoring as a community effort Sch Sci Math 116 71 82 10.1111/ssm.12158 http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ssm.12158
7. Carmel RG, Paul MW 2015 Mentoring and coaching in academia reflections on mentoring/coaching relationship Pol Futures Educ 13 479 491 10.1177/1478210315578562 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1478210315578562
8. Harley CM 2013 A win for science: the benefits of mentoring high school students in the lab J Undergrad Neurosci Educ 12 E1 E5 24319397 3852877
9. Luft JA, Roehrig GH, Patterson NC 2003 Contrasting landscapes: a comparison of the impact of different induction programs on beginning secondary science teachers’ practices, beliefs, and experiences J Res Sci Teach 40 77 97 10.1002/tea.10061 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.10061
10. Bressman S, Winter JS, Efron SE 2018 Next generation mentoring: supporting teachers beyond induction Teach Educ 73 162 170
11. Lopatto D 2010 Undergraduate research as a high-impact student experience Peer Rev 12 2 Available from https://www.aacu.org/publications-research/periodicals/undergraduate-research-high-impact-student-experience
12. Friedman HS 2002 Burnout: shattered dreams of impeccable professional performance J Clin Psychol 56 595 606 10.1002/(SICI)1097-4679(200005)56:5<595::AID-JCLP2>3.0.CO;2-Q http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4679(200005)56:5<595::AID-JCLP2>3.0.CO;2-Q
13. Feiman-Nemser S 2001 Helping novices learn to teach: lessons from an exemplary support teacher J Teach Educ 52 17 30 10.1177/0022487101052001003 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022487101052001003
14. Glazer EM, Hannafin MJ 2006 The collaborative apprenticeship model: situated professional development within school settings Teach Educ 22 179 193
15. Awaya A, McEwan H, Heyler D, Linsky S, Lum D, Wakukawa P 2003 Mentoring as a journey Teach Educ 19 45 56
16. Perry C 2000 Mentoring as partnerships in collaboration: one school’s story of professional development Mentor Tutoring 8 241 250 10.1080/713685537 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/713685537
17. Keener M, Johnson V, Collins B 2012 In-house collaborative mentoring: programs that capitalize on campus community strengths Coll Res Libr 73 3
18. Tigchelaar A, Brouwer N, Vermunt JD 2010 Tailor-made: towards a pedagogy for educating second-career teachers Educ Res Rev 5 164 183 10.1016/j.edurev.2009.11.002 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2009.11.002
19. Cox MD 2001 Faculty learning communities: change agents for transforming institutions into learning organizations Improve Acad 19 69 93 10.1002/j.2334-4822.2001.tb00525.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/j.2334-4822.2001.tb00525.x
20. Cox MD 2004 Introduction to faculty learning communities New Dir Teach Learn 97 5 23 10.1002/tl.129 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tl.129
21. Darwin A, Palmer E 2009 Mentoring circles in higher education Higher Educ Res Dev 28 125 136 10.1080/07294360902725017 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07294360902725017
22. Bell RL, Blair LM, Crawford BA, Lederman NG 2003 Just do it? Impact of a science apprenticeship program on high school students’ understandings of the nature of science and scientific inquiry J Res Sci Teach 40 487 509 10.1002/tea.10086 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.10086
23. Hanauer DI, Sera-Jacobs D, Pedulla ML, Cresawn SG, Hendrix RW, Hatfull GF 2006 Teaching scientific inquiry Science 314 1880 1881 10.1126/science.1136796 17185586 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1136796
24. Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K–12 Science Education Standards, Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council 2012 A framework for K–12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas The National Academies Press Washington, DC
25. National Science Teachers Association 2011 NSTA position statement: quality science education and 21st-century skills Available from http://www.nsta.org/about/positions/21stcentury.aspx
26. Efron E, Winter J, Bressman S 2013 Toward a more effective mentoring model: an innovative program of collaboration J Jewish Educ 78 331 336 10.1080/15244113.2012.734431 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15244113.2012.734431
27. Hanson S, Moir E 2008 Beyond mentoring: influencing the professional practice and careers of experienced teachers Phi Delta Kappan 89 453 458 10.1177/003172170808900614 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/003172170808900614
28. Lee I 2011 Teachers as presenters at continuing professional development seminars in English-as-a-foreign language context: “I find it more convincing.” Australian J Teach Educ 36 29 42
29. Vescio V, Ross D, Adams A 2008 A review of research on the impact of professional learning communities on teaching practice and student learning Teach Educ 24 80 91
30. American Society for Microbiology Microbe Conference 2016 Abstract tracks and subtracks—the profession of microbiology—K–12 science education and outreach ASM Washington, DC
31. Ambrosetti A 2014 Are you ready to be a mentor? Preparing teachers for mentoring pre-service teachers Austral J Teach Educ 39 6 article 3. http://dx.doi.org/10.14221/ajte.2014v39n6.2
32. Temperley H, Wilson A, Barrar H, Fung I 2007 Teacher professional learning and development: best evidence synthesis iteration Ministry of Education Wellington, NZ Available from https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/16901/TPLandDBESentireWeb.pdf
33. Opolot-Okurut C, Bbuye J 2014 School–university collaboration initiative: benefits and challenges in Uganda Am J Educ Res 2 843 849 10.12691/education-2-10-1 http://dx.doi.org/10.12691/education-2-10-1
34. Huling L 2000 Teacher mentoring as professional development ERIC Digest ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education Washington DC https://www.ericdigests.org/2002-3/mentoring.htm
35. Redmond P 2015 Discipline-specific online mentoring for secondary pre-service teachers Comput Educ 90 95 104 10.1016/j.compedu.2015.08.018 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.08.018
36. Straus SE, Johnson MO, Marquez C, Feldman MD 2013 Characteristics of successful and failed mentoring relationships: a qualitative study across two academic health centers Acad Med 88 82 89 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827647a0 3665769 http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827647a0
37. Edwards EA 2003 PhD thesis Retention and motivation of veteran teachers East Tennessee State University Johnson City, TN Available from https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1899&context=etd
38. Ingersoll R, Merrill L, Stuckey D 2014 Seven trends: the transformation of the teaching force Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE): Research Reports, Philadelphia, PA Available from https://repository.upenn.edu/cpre_researchreports/79
39. Powers S, Kaniuka T, Phillips B, Cain B 2016 The impact of teacher-led professional development programs on the self-efficacy of veteran teachers J Res Initiatives 2 1 article 16. Available from https://digitalcommons.uncfsu.edu/jri/vol2/iss1/16/
40. Rogers MP, Abell S, Lannin J, Wang C, Musikul K, Barker D, Dingman S 2007 Effective professional development in science and mathematics education: teachers’ and facilitators’ views Int J Sci Math Educ 5 507 532 10.1007/s10763-006-9053-8 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10763-006-9053-8
41. Chase B, Germundson R, Brownstein JC, Distad LS 2001 Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice Educ Horiz 79 143 147
42. Ufnar JA, Bolger M, Shepherd VL 2017 A retrospective study of a scientist in the classroom partnership program J High Educ Outreach Engagem 21 69 96

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v20i3.1811
2019-10-31
2019-12-12

Abstract:

Veteran biology teachers are at risk of leaving the classroom due to burnout, feeling uninspired, and overall job dissatisfaction. One way to keep veteran teachers engaged is through continued mentoring. Yet current mentoring programs vary in scope, often focus too heavily on one-to-one talk, with mentors serving as therapists, and generally fail to include veteran teachers. Considering this is not how schools operate, we argue active mentoring for veteran teachers is best when embedded into regular school practice. Collaborative mentoring, as we have termed it, pairs experienced high school teachers with other veteran colleagues, including university professors, in professional development activities centering on improving classroom practices. We believe that collaborative mentoring holds potential to meet the needs of all stakeholders—high school students for support in learning laboratory and writing skills; university faculty for hands-on classroom work and reflective practice, as well as for sharing content and pedagogical knowledge with professionals in the field; and, specifically, veteran biology teachers for expanding access to meaningful professional development opportunities. Focusing on applicable classroom pedagogy serves as a cost-effective model for professional development for veteran teachers, possibly increasing job satisfaction and teacher retention in high schools across the nation.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/20/3/jmbe-20-47.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v20i3.1811&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Experimental design of student-led guided-inquiry investigations.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2019 vol. 20 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i3.1811
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2

Click to view

FIGURE 2

Veteran teacher mentoring.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2019 vol. 20 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v20i3.1811
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error