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Insights from the Inclusive Environments and Metrics in Biology Education and Research Network: Our Experience Organizing Inclusive Biology Education Research Events

    Authors: Rebecca A. Campbell-Montalvo1,†,*, Natalia Caporale2,†, Gary S. McDowell3, Candice Idlebird4, Katie M. Wiens5, Kimberly M. Jackson6, Jana D. Marcette7, Michael E. Moore8
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269; 2: Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA 95616; 3: Lightoller LLC, Chicago, IL 60603; 4: Department of Sociology, Harris-Stowe State University, St. Louis, MO 63103; 5: Department of Science, Bay Path University, Longmeadow, MA 01106; 6: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA 30314; 7: Office of Graduate Studies, Montana State University—Billings, Billings, MT 59101; 8: Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 06 January 2020 Accepted 11 February 2020 Published 10 April 2020
    • ©2020 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Connecticut, 249 Glenbrook Road, Unit 3033, Storrs, CT 06269. Phone: 860-486-2980. E-mail: [email protected].
    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2020 vol. 21 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i1.2083
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    Abstract:

    In contrast to efforts focusing on improving inclusion in STEM classrooms from kindergarten through undergraduate (K–16), efforts to improve inclusion in scientific meetings and conferences, important hubs of STEM culture, are more recent. Markers of inclusion that are sometimes overlooked at these events can include the composition of panels, how workshops are run, the affordability of conferences, and various other mechanisms that maintain pre-existing hierarchies and norms that limit the participation of early-career researchers and individuals of minoritized cultural, linguistic, and economic backgrounds. The Inclusive Environments and Metrics in Biology Education and Research (iEMBER) network coordinates efforts of researchers from many fields interested in diversity and inclusion in biology education. Given the concerns regarding inclusion at professional meetings, iEMBER has developed and implemented several practices in planning and executing our meetings to make them more inclusive. In this report, we share our experiences developing inclusive meetings on biology education research and discuss the outcomes of such efforts. Specifically, we present our approach to planning and executing the iEMBER 2019 conference and the National Association of Biology Teachers iEMBER 2019 workshop. This report adds to the growing body of resources on inclusive meetings, provides readers with an account of how such an attempt at implementation might unfold, and complements existing theories and work relating to the importance and functioning of such meetings in terms of representation in STEM.

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2020-04-10
2020-11-23

Abstract:

In contrast to efforts focusing on improving inclusion in STEM classrooms from kindergarten through undergraduate (K–16), efforts to improve inclusion in scientific meetings and conferences, important hubs of STEM culture, are more recent. Markers of inclusion that are sometimes overlooked at these events can include the composition of panels, how workshops are run, the affordability of conferences, and various other mechanisms that maintain pre-existing hierarchies and norms that limit the participation of early-career researchers and individuals of minoritized cultural, linguistic, and economic backgrounds. The Inclusive Environments and Metrics in Biology Education and Research (iEMBER) network coordinates efforts of researchers from many fields interested in diversity and inclusion in biology education. Given the concerns regarding inclusion at professional meetings, iEMBER has developed and implemented several practices in planning and executing our meetings to make them more inclusive. In this report, we share our experiences developing inclusive meetings on biology education research and discuss the outcomes of such efforts. Specifically, we present our approach to planning and executing the iEMBER 2019 conference and the National Association of Biology Teachers iEMBER 2019 workshop. This report adds to the growing body of resources on inclusive meetings, provides readers with an account of how such an attempt at implementation might unfold, and complements existing theories and work relating to the importance and functioning of such meetings in terms of representation in STEM.

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Session norm slide showed at 2019 NABT iEMBER workshop.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2020 vol. 21 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i1.2083
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