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We Don’t Have to Lose STEM Students to Business

    Authors: Naomi L. B. Wernick1,*, Fred D. Ledley2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854; 2: Department of Natural and Applied Sciences, Bentley University, Waltham, MA 02452
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 14 January 2020 Accepted 18 February 2020 Published 30 April 2020
    • ©2020 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave, Lowell, MA 01854. Phone: 978-934-3506. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2020 vol. 21 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i1.2095
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    Abstract:

    Most undergraduate students who leave STEM majors before graduation choose careers in business. This article argues that better integrating business opportunities and context into the STEM curriculum could advance STEM learning, motivate students to remain in STEM as majors, and cultivate a constructive relationship between business, science, and society.

References & Citations

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2020-04-30
2020-07-06

Abstract:

Most undergraduate students who leave STEM majors before graduation choose careers in business. This article argues that better integrating business opportunities and context into the STEM curriculum could advance STEM learning, motivate students to remain in STEM as majors, and cultivate a constructive relationship between business, science, and society.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Career choices of all STEM majors.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2020 vol. 21 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i1.2095
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Career choices of represented and underrepresented STEM majors.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2020 vol. 21 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i1.2095
Download as Powerpoint

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