1887

An Online Interactive Video Vignette that Helps Students Learn Key Concepts of Fermentation and Respiration

    Authors: Jean A. Cardinale1,*, Dina L. Newman2, L. Kate Wright2
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    Affiliations: 1: Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802; 2: Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2020 vol. 21 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.1895
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    Abstract:

    Topics related to energy transformation and metabolism are important parts of an undergraduate biology curriculum, but these are also topics that students traditionally struggle with. To address this, we have created a short online Interactive Video Vignette (IVV) called . This IVV is designed to help students learn important ideas related to cellular respiration and metabolism. Students in various courses across four institutions were assigned the IVV as an out-of-class preinstruction homework assignment. To test the effectiveness of this IVV on student learning, we collected and analyzed data from questions embedded in the IVV, open response reflection questions, and pre- and postassessments from IVV watchers and nonwatchers. Our analysis revealed that students who completed the IVV activity interacted productively with this online tool and made significant learning gains on important topics related to cellular respiration and metabolism. This IVV is freely available via https://www.rit.edu/cos/interactive/MINT for instructors to adopt for class use.

References & Citations

1. National Research Council 1997 Science Teaching Reconsidered: A Handbook National Academies Press Washington, DC
2. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: a Call to Action Final report of a national conference organized by the AAAS with support from NSF AAAS Washington, DC
3. Brownell SE, Freeman S, Wenderoth MP, Crowe AJ, Wood WB 2014 BioCore Guide: a tool for interpreting the core concepts of Vision and Change for biology majors CBE Life Sci Educ 13 200 211 10.1187/cbe.13-12-0233 4041499 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.13-12-0233
4. Laws PW, Willis MC, Jackson DP, Koenig K, Teese R 2015 Using research-based interactive video vignettes to enhance out-of-class learning in introductory physics Phys Teach 53 114 117 10.1119/1.4905816 http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.4905816
5. Wright LK, Newman DL, Cardinale J, Teese R 2016 Web-based interactive video vignettes create a personalized active learning classroom for introducing big ideas in introductory biology Bioscene 42 32 43
6. Songer CJ, Mintzes JJ 1994 Understanding cellular respiration: an analysis of conceptual change in college biology J Res Sci Teach 31 621 637 10.1002/tea.3660310605 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.3660310605
7. Briggs AG, Hughes LE, Brennan RE, Buchner J, Horak RE, Amburn DSK, McDonald AH, Primm TP, Smith AC, Stevens AM, Yung SB, Paustian TD 2017 Concept inventory development reveals common student misconceptions about microbiology J Microbiol Biol Educ 18 18.3.55 10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1319 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1319
8. Anderson CW, Sheldon TH, Dubay J 1990 The effects of instruction on college nonmajors’ conceptions of respiration and photosynthesis J Res Sci Teach 27 761 776 10.1002/tea.3660270806 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.3660270806
9. Haladyna TM, Downing S 1989 A taxonomy of multiple-choice item-writing rules Appl Meas Educ 2 37 50 10.1207/s15324818ame0201_3 http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15324818ame0201_3
10. Haladyna T, Downing S, Rodriguez M 2002 A review of multiple-choice item-writing guidelines for classroom assessment Appl Meas Educ 15 309 334 10.1207/S15324818AME1503_5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15324818AME1503_5
11. Towns MH 2014 Guide to developing high-quality, reliable, and valid multiple-choice assessments J Chem Educ 91 1426 1431 10.1021/ed500076x http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ed500076x
12. Newman DL, Snyder CW, Fisk JN, Wright LK 2016 Development of the central dogma concept inventory (CDCI) assessment tool CBE Life Sci Educ 15 ar9 10.1187/cbe.15-06-0124 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.15-06-0124
13. Couch BA, Hubbard JK, Brassil CE 2018 Multiple-true-false questions reveal the limits of the multiple-choice format for detecting students with incomplete understandings BioScience 68 455 463 10.1093/biosci/biy037 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy037
14. Brassil CE, Couch BA 2019 Multiple-true-false questions reveal more thoroughly the complexity of student thinking than multiple-choice questions: a Bayesian item response model comparison Int J STEM Educ 6 16 10.1186/s40594-019-0169-0 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40594-019-0169-0

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.1895
2020-08-31
2020-09-26

Abstract:

Topics related to energy transformation and metabolism are important parts of an undergraduate biology curriculum, but these are also topics that students traditionally struggle with. To address this, we have created a short online Interactive Video Vignette (IVV) called . This IVV is designed to help students learn important ideas related to cellular respiration and metabolism. Students in various courses across four institutions were assigned the IVV as an out-of-class preinstruction homework assignment. To test the effectiveness of this IVV on student learning, we collected and analyzed data from questions embedded in the IVV, open response reflection questions, and pre- and postassessments from IVV watchers and nonwatchers. Our analysis revealed that students who completed the IVV activity interacted productively with this online tool and made significant learning gains on important topics related to cellular respiration and metabolism. This IVV is freely available via https://www.rit.edu/cos/interactive/MINT for instructors to adopt for class use.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Percentages of watchers ( = 303) who answered embedded multiple-choice question correctly. The watchers who got IVVQ5 wrong were given additional instruction and a second chance to answer the question (IVVQ5-redo, = 39).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2020 vol. 21 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.1895
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Percentages of students choosing each option on the pre- and postassessment. Students were instructed to “choose all that apply” for each question. The data include all students who watched the Fermentation IVV and took both pre- and post-tests ( = 194 students). Green bars indicate correct choices, red indicates incorrect choices. PPQ, pre-/post question. Light-colored bars indicate pre-test data, and dark-colored bars indicate post-test data.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2020 vol. 21 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.1895
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Average number of correct options that are selected per question on pre- and post-test assessments. Students chose more correct options for all questions on the post-test. Each question had three correct options. On average, students increased from 5.5 to 7.1 total correct answers out of 9 ( = 194 students). Error bars represent standard errors of the means (SEM). The pre-test–post-test differences were highly significant by -test ( < 0.00001 for each question and overall), and the effect size was medium to large (Cohen’s = 0.46 to 0.98 for each question and 0.95 overall).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2020 vol. 21 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.1895
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4

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FIGURE 4

Normalized learning gains by Fermentation IVV watchers versus nonwatchers. At Institution A, watchers ( = 52) made nearly double the learning gains of nonwatchers ( = 56). Normalized learning gains were calculated using the formula (post – pre)/(1 – pre). Error bars are SEM. The difference was significant by -test ( = 0.0119), and the effect size was moderate (Cohen’s = 0.6389).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2020 vol. 21 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.1895
Download as Powerpoint

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