1887

Establishing Partnerships for Science Outreach Inside and Outside the Undergraduate Classroom

    Authors: M. Todd Knippenberg1,2,*, Anne Leak3,*, Shirley Disseler3, Verónica A. Segarra1,4,†
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: High Point’s University Mobile Community Lab Program, High Point, NC 27268; 2: Department of Chemistry, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268; 3: Department of Educator Preparation, Stout School of Education, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268; 4: Department of Biology, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 30 October 2019 Accepted 17 July 2020 Published 31 August 2020
    • ©2020 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: One University Parkway, High Point, NC 27268. Phone: 336-841-9507. E-mail: [email protected].
    • * These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. August 2020 vol. 21 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.2025
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    Abstract:

    STEM outreach experiences provide aspiring scientists and healthcare professionals with opportunities to grow into new roles, integrate knowledge, and acquire soft skills. While STEM outreach publications often describe the outreach performed, few focus on how to establish strong partnerships, which are essential for outreach endeavors to succeed. Information on this is more important than ever before—grant agencies commonly require education and outreach plans that will reach a broader audience. Consequently, principal investigators who are not trained in education or outreach need tools to set up strong partnerships. To help fill this gap, here we outline the recommended steps for developing robust interdisciplinary STEM outreach programs that leverage institutional resources and community partnerships. This process yields strategic and sustainable opportunities for undergraduate students to learn as they engage with the STEM outreach team (students, faculty, university staff, and community partners) and the lay public. The outlined ideas broadly apply to creating outreach programs for trainees at any stage, not just undergraduates.

References & Citations

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4. Hegedus T, Segarra VA, Allen T, Wilson H, Garr C, Budzinski C 2016 The art-science connection: students create art inspired by extracurricular investigations Sci Teach 83 25 31
5. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: a Call to Action A summary of recommendations made at a national conference organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science July 15–17, 2009 AAAS Washington, DC
6. Association of American Medical Colleges 2009 Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians AAMC-HHMI Washington, DC
7. Brownell SE, Price JV, Steinman LA 2013 Writing-intensive course improves biology undergraduates’ perception and confidence of their abilities to read scientific literature and communicate science Adv Physiol Educ 37 70 79 10.1152/advan.00138.2012 23471252 http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/advan.00138.2012
8. Segarra VA, Tillery M 2018 Key concepts in developmental psychology and science pedagogy help undergraduates in high school science outreach J Microbiol Biol Educ 19 10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1508 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1508
9. Arangala C 2013 Developing curiosity in science with service J Civic Commit 20 1 10
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11. Gubbels JA, Seasson PV 2018 Creating and teaching science lessons in K–12 schools increases undergraduate students’ science identity J Microbiol Biol Educ 19 10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1594 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1594
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.2025
2020-08-31
2020-09-26

Abstract:

STEM outreach experiences provide aspiring scientists and healthcare professionals with opportunities to grow into new roles, integrate knowledge, and acquire soft skills. While STEM outreach publications often describe the outreach performed, few focus on how to establish strong partnerships, which are essential for outreach endeavors to succeed. Information on this is more important than ever before—grant agencies commonly require education and outreach plans that will reach a broader audience. Consequently, principal investigators who are not trained in education or outreach need tools to set up strong partnerships. To help fill this gap, here we outline the recommended steps for developing robust interdisciplinary STEM outreach programs that leverage institutional resources and community partnerships. This process yields strategic and sustainable opportunities for undergraduate students to learn as they engage with the STEM outreach team (students, faculty, university staff, and community partners) and the lay public. The outlined ideas broadly apply to creating outreach programs for trainees at any stage, not just undergraduates.

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