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Do Students Learn Better with Pecha Kucha, an Alternative Presentation Format?

    Authors: Min-Ken Liao1,*, Greg Lewis1, Mike Winiski2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Biology Department, Furman University, Greenville, SC 29613; 2: Community-Engaged Learning, Furman University, Greenville, SC 29613
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 18 February 2020 Accepted 27 July 2020 Published 12 November 2020
    • ©2020 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613. Phone: 864-294-3246. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. November 2020 vol. 21 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v21i3.2111
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    Abstract:

    Oral presentation assignments help students develop and engage multiple learning skills. In the process of preparing a presentation, students search and evaluate information (evidence-based engagement), decide whether to include it (content relevancy), organize information in an engaging manner (audience engagement), adhere to the presentation instructions (logistics), and attempt to appear credible (credibility). The final product is often a 15-minute PowerPoint presentation. In this study, we introduced students to the Pecha Kucha presentation format: 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each. While previous studies claimed that Pecha Kucha is pedagogically superior to traditional formats, particularly in the presentation and communication competence, its impacts on learning have not been examined. This study, which involved students in three classes, was designed to do so. All the students presented twice in a semester, but in one class, the first presentation was in Pecha Kucha and second in the traditional format and in the other two classes, the first was in the traditional format and second in Pecha Kucha. Five decision-making categories were assessed: evidence-based engagement, content relevancy, audience engagement, logistics, and credibility. Also assessed were the students’ confidence levels in presentation. The statistically significant differences between these two formats mostly reflected the intentional selection of presentation material to meet the time constraint of the Pecha Kucha format. However, all were slightly more confident in presentation after the second one. Students also reported that they preferred listening to Pecha Kucha than to traditional PowerPoint presentations.

References & Citations

1. Finch DJ, Hamilton LK, Baldwin R, Zehner M 2013 An exploratory study of factors affecting undergraduate employability Educ Train 55 681 704 10.1108/ET-07-2012-0077 http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ET-07-2012-0077
2. Schlee RP, Harich KR 2010 Knowledge and skill requirements for marketing jobs in the 21st century J Mark Educ 32 341 352 10.1177/0273475310380881 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0273475310380881
3. McGunagle D, Zizka L 2018 Meeting real world demands of the global economy: an employer’s perspective J Aviat Aeros Educ Res 27 59 76
4. Beyer AM 2011 Improving student presentations: Pecha Kucha and just plain PowerPoint Teach Psychol 38 122 126 10.1177/0098628311401588 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0098628311401588
5. Klentzin JC, Paladino EB, Johnston B, Devine C 2010 Pecha Kucha: using “lightning talk” in university instruction Ref Serv Rev 38 158 167 10.1108/00907321011020798 http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00907321011020798
6. Lehtonen M 2011 Communicating competence through Pechakucha presentations Int J Bus Commun 48 464 481 10.1177/0021943611414542 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0021943611414542
7. Johnson DA, Christensen J 2011 A comparison of simplified-visually rich and traditional presentation styles Teach Psychol 38 293 297 10.1177/0098628311421333 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0098628311421333

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v21i3.2111
2020-11-12
2020-12-03

Abstract:

Oral presentation assignments help students develop and engage multiple learning skills. In the process of preparing a presentation, students search and evaluate information (evidence-based engagement), decide whether to include it (content relevancy), organize information in an engaging manner (audience engagement), adhere to the presentation instructions (logistics), and attempt to appear credible (credibility). The final product is often a 15-minute PowerPoint presentation. In this study, we introduced students to the Pecha Kucha presentation format: 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each. While previous studies claimed that Pecha Kucha is pedagogically superior to traditional formats, particularly in the presentation and communication competence, its impacts on learning have not been examined. This study, which involved students in three classes, was designed to do so. All the students presented twice in a semester, but in one class, the first presentation was in Pecha Kucha and second in the traditional format and in the other two classes, the first was in the traditional format and second in Pecha Kucha. Five decision-making categories were assessed: evidence-based engagement, content relevancy, audience engagement, logistics, and credibility. Also assessed were the students’ confidence levels in presentation. The statistically significant differences between these two formats mostly reflected the intentional selection of presentation material to meet the time constraint of the Pecha Kucha format. However, all were slightly more confident in presentation after the second one. Students also reported that they preferred listening to Pecha Kucha than to traditional PowerPoint presentations.

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