1887

Microscopic Communities: Interdisciplinary Exploration of Microbes in the Classroom

    Authors: Jennifer A. Surtees1,2,3,*, Sandra K. Small3,4, Jennifer N. Tripp5, Lynn E. Shanahan5,6
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biochemistry, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14203; 2: Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14203; 3: Genome, Environment and Microbiome Community of Excellence, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14203; 4: New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14203; 5: Department of Learning and Instruction, Graduate School of Education, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY, 14260; 6: Amherst Central School District, Amherst, NY 14226
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 02 July 2020 Accepted 20 November 2020 Published 29 January 2021
    • ©2021 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: 955 Main St., 4215 Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14203. Phone: 716-829-6083. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. January 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    2.15 MB
  • XML
    49.39 Kb
  • HTML
    50.65 Kb

    Abstract:

    Children are aware of microbes from a young age and are rightly encouraged to wash their hands to prevent illness. However, myriad microbes live in, on, and around us, most of which are benign or beneficial. Our goal was to teach elementary students about microbiota by leveraging familiar literacy practices, social studies themes, and the arts to advance students’ knowledge and reasoning skills in science. With this perspective in mind, we developed and implemented an interdisciplinary unit targeted at second grade, in which students learned about microbes and microbial communities. Our goal was to further students’ conceptual knowledge of the microbes that surround them by purposefully integrating microbial communities within the second grade curriculum. Throughout the unit, students engaged in hands-on, inquiry-based science experiences and used multimodal communication (through a combination of linguistic, visual, audio, gestural, and spatial modes): they sampled microbes from their own bodies and/or environments and applied their knowledge and imagination to create their own microbes through art and story-telling, generating a class microbial community—both literal and artistic. At the end of the unit, students demonstrated knowledge of microbes and of the diversity and ubiquity of microbial communities and habitats.

References & Citations

1. Rogers YH, Zhang C 2016 Chapter 2 – Genomic technologies in medicine and health: past, present, and future, 15–28 Kumar D, Antonarakis S Medical and health genomics Elsevier Inc 10.1016/B978-0-12-420196-5.00002-2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-420196-5.00002-2
2. Berg G, Rybakova D, Fischer D, Cernava T, Champomier Vergès M-C, Charles T, Chen X, Cocolin L, Eversole K, Corral GH, Kazou M, Kinkel L, Lange L, Lima N, Loy A, Macklin JA, Maguin E, Mauchline T, McClure R, Mitter B, Ryan M, Sarand I, Smidt H, Schelkle B, Roume H, Seghal Kiran G, Selvin J, Soares Correa de Souza R, van Overbeek L, Singh BK, Wagner M, Walsh A, Sessitsch A, Schloter M 2020 Microbiome definition re-visited: old concepts and new challenges Microbiome 8 1 22 10.1186/s40168-020-00875-0 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40168-020-00875-0
3. Ho HE, Bunyavanich S 2018 Role of the microbiome in food allergy Curr Allerg Asthma Rep 18 4 10.1007/s11882-018-0780-z http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11882-018-0780-z
4. Byrd A, Belkaid Y, Segre J 2018 The human skin microbiome Nat Rev Microbiol 16 143 155 10.1038/nrmicro.2017.157 29332945 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro.2017.157
5. DeSalle R, Perkins SL, Wynne PJ 2015 Welcome to the microbiome: getting to know the trillions of bacteria and other microbes in, on, and around you Yale University Press New Haven, CT
6. Next Generation Science Standards Lead States 2013 Next Generation Science Standards: for states, by states The National Academies Press Washington, DC
7. Common Core State Standards Initiative 2016 Read the standards Retrieved from www.corestandards.org/read-the-standards/
8. Knippenberg MT, Leak A, Disseler S, Segarra VA 2020 Establishing partnerships for science outreach inside and outside the undergraduate classroom J Microbiol Biol Educ 21 2 1 6 10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.2025 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v21i2.2025
9. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 2018 How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures National Academies Press Washington, DC
10. Davies N 2016 Tiny Creatures: the World of Microbes Candlewick Press Somerville, MA.
11. Brown B, Donovan B, Wild A 2019 Language and cognitive interference: how using complex scientific language limits cognitive performance Sci Educ 103 4 750 769 10.1002/sce.21509 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sce.21509
12. Varelas M, Pappas C 2013 Children’s ways with science and literacy: integrated multimodal enactments in urban elementary classrooms Routledge Press New York, NY 10.4324/9780203076910 http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203076910
13. Michaels S, O’Connor C 2015 Conceptualizing talk moves as tools: professional development approaches for academically productive discussion 347 362 Resnick L, Asterhan C, Clark S Socializing Intelligence through Academic Talk and Dialogue American Educational Research Association 10.3102/978-0-935302-43-1_27 http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/978-0-935302-43-1_27
14. Kress GR 2010 Multimodality: a social semiotic approach to contemporary communication Routledge London
15. National Coalition for Core Art Standards 2013 The national core arts standards: a conceptual framework for arts learning https://www.nationalartsstandards.org/sites/default/files/NCCAS%20%20Conceptual%20Framework_0.pdf
16. American Society for Microbiology 2012 Appendix to the guidelines for biosafety in teaching laboratories https://www.asm.org/ASM/media/Education/Biosafety-Guidelines-Appendix.pdf

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
2021-01-29
2021-02-27

Abstract:

Children are aware of microbes from a young age and are rightly encouraged to wash their hands to prevent illness. However, myriad microbes live in, on, and around us, most of which are benign or beneficial. Our goal was to teach elementary students about microbiota by leveraging familiar literacy practices, social studies themes, and the arts to advance students’ knowledge and reasoning skills in science. With this perspective in mind, we developed and implemented an interdisciplinary unit targeted at second grade, in which students learned about microbes and microbial communities. Our goal was to further students’ conceptual knowledge of the microbes that surround them by purposefully integrating microbial communities within the second grade curriculum. Throughout the unit, students engaged in hands-on, inquiry-based science experiences and used multimodal communication (through a combination of linguistic, visual, audio, gestural, and spatial modes): they sampled microbes from their own bodies and/or environments and applied their knowledge and imagination to create their own microbes through art and story-telling, generating a class microbial community—both literal and artistic. At the end of the unit, students demonstrated knowledge of microbes and of the diversity and ubiquity of microbial communities and habitats.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/22/1/jmbe-22-6.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Student streaking sample onto agar plate.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. January 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2

Click to view

FIGURE 2

(A) This student properly labeled the rows of the table and filled in accurate descriptions of the observations of each plate. (B) This student swabbed a quarter and their right hand. The drawings accurately depict the colony growth that was observed on the plates and show the different colony shapes that grew. (C) Agar plates after incubation gathered together. Student names have been blurred for privacy. (D) This student used the observation chart to draw conclusions about the observed similarities and differences. Color was written as both a similarity and a difference because the student observed that some colonies were the same color but they were not all the same color.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. January 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

Click to view

FIGURE 3

A student’s misinterpretation of the instructions in an early Microbiota Lab Notes packet.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. January 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4

Click to view

FIGURE 4

(A) A student’s story about the art microbial community she created with Patritia and the Strong Sergeant Army Man. (B) A student’s story about the art microbial community he created about good microbes fighting bad microbes..

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. January 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 5

Click to view

FIGURE 5

A class art microbiota.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. January 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2207
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error