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COVID-360: A Collaborative Effort to Develop a Multidisciplinary Set of Online Resources for Engaging Teaching on the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Authors: Victoria Del Gaizo Moore1,#, Lisa Z. Scheifele2,#, Joseph W. Chihade3, Joseph J. Provost4, Jennifer A. Roecklein-Canfield5, Nikolaos Tsotakos6, Michael J. Wolyniak7,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Chemistry, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244; 2: Department of Biology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21210; 3: Department of Chemistry, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057; 4: Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA 92110; 5: Department of Chemistry & Physics, Simmons University, Boston, MA 02115; 6: School of Science, Engineering, and Technology, Penn State Harrisburg, Middletown, PA 17057; 7: Deparment of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 19 January 2021 Accepted 25 January 2021 Published 31 March 2021
    • ©2021 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author: Mailing address: Department of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, PO Box 183, Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943. E-mail: [email protected].
    • # These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2623
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    Abstract:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged undergraduate instructors and students in an unprecedented manner. Each has needed to find creative ways to continue the engaged teaching and learning process in an environment defined by physical separation and emotional anxiety and uncertainty. As a potential tool to meet this challenge, we developed a set of curricular materials that combined our respective life science teaching interests with the real-time scientific problem of the COVID-19 pandemic in progress. Discrete modules were designed that are engaging to students, implement active learning–based coursework in a variety of institutional and learning settings, and can be used either in person or remotely. The resulting interdisciplinary curriculum, dubbed “COVID-360,” enables instructors to select from a menu of curricular options that best fit their course content, desired activities, and mode of class delivery. Here we describe how we devised the COVID-360 curriculum and how it represents our efforts to creatively and effectively respond to the instructional needs of diverse students in the face of an ongoing instructional crisis.

References & Citations

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2. Ives KS 2020 Moving classes online is hard. Online discussion can help Inside Higher Ed 1 Apr https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2020/04/01/how-cultivate-student-collaboration-and-engagement-online-learning-opinion
3. Procko K, Bell JK, Benore MA, Booth RE, Del Gaizo Moore V, Dries DR, Martin DJ, Mertz PS, Offerdahl EG, Payne MA, Vega QC, Provost JJ 2020 Moving biochemistry and molecular biology courses online in times of disruption: recommended practices and resources—a collaboration with the faculty community and ASBMB Biochem Mol Biol Educ https://doi.org/10.1002/bmb.21354 10.1002/bmb.21354 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmb.21354
4. Allen D, Tanner K 2005 Infusing active learning into the large-enrollment biology class: seven strategies, from the simple to complex CBE Life Sci Educ 4 4 262 268 10.1187/cbe.05-08-0113 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.05-08-0113
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6. Collaço CM 2017 Increasing student engagement in higher education J High Ed Theory Pract 17 4 40 47
7. Tibell LAE, Rundgren CJ 2010 Educational challenges of molecular life science: Characteristics and implications for education and research CBE Life Sci Educ 9 1 25 33 10.1187/cbe.08-09-0055 20194805 2830159 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.08-09-0055
8. Vasaly HL, Feser J, Lettrich MD, Correa K, Denniston KJ 2014 Vision and change in the biology community: snapshots of change CBE Life Sci Educ 13 1 16 20 10.1187/cbe.13-12-0234 24591498 3940456 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.13-12-0234
9. O’Neal C, Pinder-Grover T n.d Implementing active learning in your classroom https://crlt.umich.edu/active_learning_implementing
10. Miller S, Pfund C, Handelsman J 2007 Scientific teaching W. H. Freeman New York, NY
11. Khan A, Egbue O, Palkie B, Madden J 2017 Active learning: engaging students to maximize learning in an online course Elec J e-Learn 15 2 107 115
12. Konstantopoulou G, Raikou N 2020 Clinical evaluation of depression in university students during quarantine due to COVID-19 pandemic Eur J Public Health Stud 3 1 10.46827/ejphs.v3i1.65. http://dx.doi.org/10.46827/ejphs.v3i1.65.
13. Liang SW, Chen RN, Liu LL, Li XG, Chen JB, Tang SY, Zhao JB 2020 The psychological impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on Guangdong college students: the difference between seeking and not seeking psychological help Front Psychol 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.02231 http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.02231
14. Rodríguez-Rey R, Garrido-Hernansaiz H, Collado S 2020 Psychological impact and associated factors during the initial stage of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic among the general population in Spain Front Psychol 11 1540 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01540 32655463 7325630 http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01540
15. Islam AN, Laato S, Talukder S, Sutinen E 2020 Misinformation sharing and social media fatigue during COVID-19: an affordance and cognitive load perspective Technol Forecast Soc 159 120201 10.1016/j.techfore.2020.120201 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2020.120201
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2021-03-31
2021-05-14

Abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged undergraduate instructors and students in an unprecedented manner. Each has needed to find creative ways to continue the engaged teaching and learning process in an environment defined by physical separation and emotional anxiety and uncertainty. As a potential tool to meet this challenge, we developed a set of curricular materials that combined our respective life science teaching interests with the real-time scientific problem of the COVID-19 pandemic in progress. Discrete modules were designed that are engaging to students, implement active learning–based coursework in a variety of institutional and learning settings, and can be used either in person or remotely. The resulting interdisciplinary curriculum, dubbed “COVID-360,” enables instructors to select from a menu of curricular options that best fit their course content, desired activities, and mode of class delivery. Here we describe how we devised the COVID-360 curriculum and how it represents our efforts to creatively and effectively respond to the instructional needs of diverse students in the face of an ongoing instructional crisis.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Graphical representation of the interdisciplinary nature of the COVID-360 curriculum collection. Illustrated in each branch are specific examples of active learning activities that can be used by themselves or in combination to generate a curriculum tailored to the needs of specific instructors.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2021 vol. 22 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2623
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