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Learning Partnerships Between Undergraduate Biology Students and Younger Learners

    Author: LEE ABRAHAMSEN1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Bates College Department of Biology, Carnegie Science, 44 Campus Avenue, Lewiston, Maine 04240
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Bates College Department of Biology, Carnegie Science, 44 Campus Avenue, Lewiston, ME 04240. Phone: (207) 786-6108. Fax: (207) 786-8334. E-mail: [email protected].
    • Copyright © 2004, American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2004 vol. 5 no. 1 21-29. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v5.74
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    Abstract:

    In two upper-level elective biology courses and one beginning-level general biology course, college students participated in Learning Partnerships with middle or high school classes to study some aspect of biology. The goals were to enhance learning by providing resources to middle and high school students and teachers and by encouraging college students to consider teaching as a learning tool and a possible career goal. The college students designed lessons, activities, and laboratories that were done at the schools and at Bates College. Feedback and data suggest that the partnerships have helped teachers enrich their curricula, enhanced student learning, encouraged additional high school students to consider applying to college, and encouraged college students to consider teaching science.

Key Concept Ranking

Bacteria
0.7737056
Microscopes
0.75
0.7737056

References & Citations

1. Benson L, Harkavy I 2000 The role of community-higher education-school partnerships in educational and societal development and democratization Universities and Community Schools 7 1–2 5 28
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3. Buxeda RJ, Moore DA 1999 Using learning-styles data to design a microbiology course J Coll Sci Teaching 29 159 164
4. Buxeda RJ, Moore DA 2000 Transforming a sequence of microbiology courses using student profile data Microbiol Educ 1 1 6
5. Cain SE 2002 Sciencing 4th ed Merill Prentice Hall Columbus, Ohio
6. Cantor JA 1995 Experiential learning in higher education: linking classroom and community ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, no 7 George Washington University, Graduate School of Education and Human Development Washington, D.C
7. DebBurman SK 2002 Learning how scientists work: experiential research projects to promote cell biology learning and scientific process skills Cell Biol Educ 1 154 172 10.1187/cbe.02-07-0024 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.02-07-0024
8. Enos SL, Troppe ML 1996 Service learning in the curriculum 156 181 Jacoby B Associates Service-learning in higher education: concepts and practices Jossey-Bass San Francisco, Calif
9. Fink LD 2002 Beyond small groups: harnessing the extraordinary power of learning teams Michaelson LK, Knight AB, Fink LD Team-based learning: a transformative use of small groups Praeger Press Westport, Conn
10. Hoffman EA 2001 Successful application of active learning techniques to introductory microbiology Microbiol Educ 2 5 11
11. Lawson HA 2002 Beyond community involvement and service learning to engaged universities Universities Community Schools 7 1–2 79 94
12. Leonard WH 2000 How do college students best learn science? J Coll Sci Teaching 29 385 388
13. Lord TR 2001 101 reasons to use cooperative learning in biology teaching Am Bio Teacher 63 30 38
14. McInerney MJ, Dee Fink L 2003 Team-based learning enhances long-term retention and critical thinking in an undergraduate microbial physiology course Microbiol Educ 4 3 12
15. McNeal AP, D’Avanzo C 1997 Student-active science: models of innovation in college science teaching Saunders Orlando, Fla
16. Moreno NP 1999 K-12 science education reform—a primer for scientists BioScience 49 569 576 10.2307/1313477 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1313477
17. National Research Council 1996 National science education standards National Academy Press Washington, D.C.
18. Tanner K, Allen D 2002 Approaches to cell biology teaching: a primer on standards Cell Biol Educ 1 95 100 10.1187/cbe.02-09-0046 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.02-09-0046
19. Zoller U 2000 Teaching tomorrow’s college science courses— are we getting it right? J Coll Sci Teaching 29 409 414

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v5.74
2004-05-01
2019-08-25

Abstract:

In two upper-level elective biology courses and one beginning-level general biology course, college students participated in Learning Partnerships with middle or high school classes to study some aspect of biology. The goals were to enhance learning by providing resources to middle and high school students and teachers and by encouraging college students to consider teaching as a learning tool and a possible career goal. The college students designed lessons, activities, and laboratories that were done at the schools and at Bates College. Feedback and data suggest that the partnerships have helped teachers enrich their curricula, enhanced student learning, encouraged additional high school students to consider applying to college, and encouraged college students to consider teaching science.

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Figures

Image of FIG. 1

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FIG. 1

An example of a Learning Partnership in Bacteriology entitled “Bacteria in Your Environment.” Bacteriology is a junior-senior level biology major elective course.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2004 vol. 5 no. 1 21-29. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v5.74
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Image of FIG. 2

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FIG. 2

An example of a Learning Partnership in Learning and Teaching Biology entitled “Cells and How We Look At Them.” The course is a beginning-level majors and nonmajors course that satisfies a general education requirement. First-year students comprised about half of the class.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2004 vol. 5 no. 1 21-29. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v5.74
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Image of FIG. 3

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FIG. 3

Teacher evaluations of college student performance during Learning Partnerships. Teachers were asked to rank each student group’s preparation for class or lab work (white bars), the professionalism of the group members (stippled bars), the scientific accuracy of all presentations (black bars), and the interest level of their own class (striped bars) on a scale of “poor,” “fair,” “average,” “good,” or “great.” Bars represent the number of teachers giving each response.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2004 vol. 5 no. 1 21-29. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v5.74
Download as Powerpoint

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